[lit-ideas] Re: Geary's Art Poetica

  • From: Donal McEvoy <donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2014 11:27:44 +0000 (UTC)

>There may -- but as someone may challenge, there may not -- be a connection 
 between the 'startling' and what Socrates (nay, Plato?) thought the origin 
of  'philosophy' was: wonder*.>
JLS' post then went on not to mention a little known Oxford philosopher who 
went to America and talked of "implicature". It also went on not to mention 
"implicature" (unless this was mentioned by "implicature" and I missed it). 
Clearly not just poetry can startle.
DL
  

     On Saturday, 29 November 2014, 21:51, "dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" 
<dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
   

 

In a message dated 11/29/2014 2:40:56  P.M. Eastern Standard Time, 
jejunejesuit.geary2@xxxxxxxxx writes:
I like best  poetry that startles me.  The poet -- his or her life, values, 
morality,  philosophy, intelligence, history, ranking as a poet (by anyone) 
-- is of very  little concern to me.  What if Hitler had been a poet, could 
I be so  cavalier about the poet-as-person as I claim to be?  I don't know. 
  All I ask from a poet is startle -- startle at the use of language, 
startle at  an awareness, startle at horror -- startle at just being alive.  
Pretty  words don't impress me unless they're so damn pretty they startle me.  
I've  never found anything that I didn't want to read about -- no matter how 
personal  or confessional as long as it startles me into an awareness that 
wasn't there a  moment ago.  That's all I look for.  Take care.  


----
 
There may -- but as someone may challenge, there may not -- be a connection 
 between the 'startling' and what Socrates (nay, Plato?) thought the origin 
of  'philosophy' was: wonder*.
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 
(a)
 
Etymology Online:
startle (v.) 
c.1300, "run to and fro" (intransitive), frequentative of  sterten (see 
start (v.)). Sense of "move suddenly in surprise or fear" first  recorded 
1520s. Transitive meaning "frighten suddenly" is from 1590s. The word  retains 
more of the original meaning of start (v.). Related: Startled;  startling; 
startlingly. As a noun from 1714.
 
(b)
 
At Theaetetus 155d3, Plato calls “wonder” (thaumazein) the origin of  
philosophy. Notoriously, Aristotle follows Plato in this assessment at  
Metaphysics 2.982 b.
 
Liddell/Scott, "Greek Lexicon":
A.“θαυμάσομαι” A.Pr.476, E.Alc.157, Pl.Prm.129c, Ep. 
“θαυμάσσομαι”  Il.18.467; also “θαυμάσω” Hp.Nat.Puer. 29, Plu.2.823f, etc. (in 
X.Cyr.5.2.12  θαυμάζουσι is restored for -σουσι, θαυμάσετε is v.l. 
for -σαιτε, Id.HG5.1.14):  aor. “ἐθαύμασα” A.Th.772 (lyr.), etc., Ep. 
“θαύμασα” h.Merc.414: pf. “τεθαύμακα”  X.Mem.1.4.2, etc.:—Med., 
Gal.Med.Phil.2 (v.l.), Ael.VH12.30: aor. 1 ἐθαυμασάμην  v.l. in 
Aesop.92; οὐκ ἂν θαυμας ώμεθα (leg. -σαίμεθα) Procl.in Prm.p.750S.;  
θαυμάσαιτο v.l. in J.BJ3.5.1:—Pass., fut. “-ασθήσομαι” Isoc.6.105, 
Th.2.41: aor.  “ἐθαυμάσθην” Id.6.12: pf. “τεθαύμασμαι” Plb.4.82.1.
1. abs., wonder,  marvel,
 
(c)
 
ROGET's Hyperlinked Thesaurus
_www.roget.org/_ (http://www.roget.org/)  - Similar
Senses and synonyms of the word
- startle -
#508 Inexpectation: Vb. start, startle, jump out of one's skin -- take away 
 one's breath, throw on one's beam ends, throw off one's guard, upset, 
unsettle,  bowl down, bowl over, startle, start, electrify, jar, jolt, stagger, 
give a  turn, make one jump out of his skin, take aback.
#669 Alarm: Vb.  startle.
#860 Fear: Vb. start, startle, jump out of one's skin -- startle.
#870 Wonder: Vb. flabbergast, confound, overwhelm, astonish, amaze,  
astound, surprise, startle, stagger, bewilder.
#871 Expectance: Vb. flabbergast, confound, overwhelm, astonish, amaze,  
astound, surprise, startle, stagger, bewilder.
#872 Prodigy: Vb. bewilder, flabbergast, confound, overwhelm, astonish,  
amaze, astound, surprise, startle, stagger.
 
 
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