[lit-ideas] Re: Geary and the Essence of Language

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "Jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 17 Jan 2016 13:50:01 -0500

Is languageness the essence of language?
 
By the same token, black-ravenness is the essence of black ravens (cfr.  
Reichenbach, "All blacks are raven -- except albino ones.")
 
In a message dated 1/17/2016 12:39:11 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx writes:
"The Popper-Buehler functions of language  are non-essentialist in several 
senses."
 
Or ways, as I prefer. Usually, there are two senses: spin and anti-spin,  
while ways are almost infinite: the four cardinal points, N, S, E, and W, and 
 all their combos.
 
McEvoy goes on
 
"An interesting aspect of the Popper-Buehler thesis is that it takes the  
only function of language that is necessarily always present - the expressive 
 function - as a trivial or trite aspect of language, and not "essential" 
in that  its presence reveals anything deep about linguistic function [as 
Popper  explains, even a clock or a burp must "express its own state", and so 
any use of  language must be expressive in this sense]. In other words, only 
the very lowest  function of language is essential and it is not essential 
in any way that  reveals anything interesting about the nature of language - 
rather it is  essential because (as a metaphysical and supra-linguistic 
truth) 'objects'  cannot help expressing their own state."
 
Actually, Grice claims that
 
i. Grice burps.
 
can be simulated. I.e. Grice can FAKE a burp -- ("In some Eastern cultures, 
 a burp is simulated to signal that you liked the food you were offered." 
He was  a very travelled man).
 
Geary refers to this as the 'implicature' of a burp.
 
McEvoy:

"This Popper-Buehler thesis is supplemented by Popper's  theory of W3, 
where it is the vital function of language to access W3 content -  but this 
vital function is not an 'essence' but a contingent and emergent  metaphysical 
fact (that emerged from complex W1 and W2 interactions, mediated by  'natural 
selection')."
 
"Vital" must be metaphorical. Only living beings have vital properties, and 
 surely Shakespeare is dead, but what he wrote is linguistic. To say that  
Shakespeare's language has a 'vital' function Shakespeare may find it  
metaphorical enough to include it in one of his love sonnets to the Earl of  
Southampton (who loved a simile, alas).
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: