[lit-ideas] Europa

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2017 20:14:14 -0400

Fjeld was wondering about Europe. I wonder if Popper would think that ‘the myth 
of Europe’ is irrefutable.

In classical Graeco-Roman mythology, Europa (Ancient Greek: Εὐρώπη) is the name 
of of an ancient queen.

The name contains the elements εὐρύς, "wide, broad" and ὤψ, "eye, face, 
countenance", hence the name of the queen would mean "wide-gazing" or "broad of 
aspect". 

Broad is an epithet of Earth herself in the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European 
religion and the poetry devoted to it.

For the second part, compare also the divine attributes of "grey-eyed" Athena 
(γλαυκῶπις) or ox-eyed Hera (βοὠπις).

There have been attempts to connect Eurṓpē to a Semitic term for "west", this 
being either Akkadian erebu meaning "to go down, set" (said of the sun) or 
Phoenician 'ereb "evening, west", which is at the origin of Arabic Maghreb and 
Hebrew ma'arav.

In fact, Michael A. Barry, professor in Princeton University's Near Eastern 
Studies Department, finds the mention of the word Ereb on an Assyrian stele 
with the meaning of "night, [the country of] sunset", in opposition to Asu 
"[the country of] sunrise", i.e. Asia.

The same naming motive according to "cartographic convention" appears in Greek 
Ἀνατολή (Anatolḗ "[sun] rise", "east", hence Anatolia).

Martin Litchfield West stated that "phonologically, the match between Europa's 
name and any form of the Semitic word is very poor."

Next to these hypotheses there is also a Proto-Indo-European root *h1regʷos, 
meaning "darkness", which also produced Greek Erebus.

Most major world languages use words derived from Eurṓpē or Europa to refer to 
the continent.

Chinese, for example, uses the word Ōuzhōu (歐洲/欧洲).

A similar Chinese-derived term Ōshū (欧州) is also sometimes used in Japanese 
such as in the Japanese name of the European Union, Ōshū Rengō (欧州連合), despite 
the katakana Yōroppa (ヨーロッパ) being more commonly used.

In some Turkic languages the originally Persian name Frangistan ("land of the 
Franks") is used casually in referring to much of Europe, besides official 
names such as Avrupa or Evropa.

Note that if “Brexit means Brexit,” when translated to Japanese (where ‘the 
European Union’ is referred to as either Ōshū Rengō (欧州連合), or Yōroppa (ヨーロッパ), 
May’s tautology comes out as more obscure. For surely May’s point is that the 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland may leave the European 
Union, but surely they cannot leave Europe!

The name Europe, as a geographical term, was first used by the Ancient Greek 
geographer Strabo to refer to part of Thrace below the Balkan mountains. 

Later, under the Roman Empire the name was given to a Thracian province.

It is derived from the Greek word Εὐρώπη in all Romance languages, Germanic 
languages, Slavic languages, Baltic languages, Celtic languages, Iranian 
languages, and Uralic languages (Hungarian Európa, Finnish Eurooppa, Estonian 
Euroopa).

Jürgen Fischer, in Oriens-Occidens-Europa summarized how the name came into 
use, supplanting the oriens-occidens dichotomy of the later Roman Empire, which 
was expressive of a divided empire, Latin in the West, Greek in the East.

In the 8th century, ecclesiastical uses of "Europa" for the imperium of 
Charlemagne provide the source for the modern geographical term.

The first use of the term Europenses, to describe peoples of the Christian, 
western portion of the continent, appeared in the Hispanic Latin Chronicle of 
754, sometimes attributed to an author called Isidore Pacensis in reference to 
the Battle of Tours fought against Muslim forces.

The European Union has also used Europa as a symbol of pan-Europeanism, notably 
by naming its web portal after her, and depicting her on the Greek €2 coin and 
on several gold and silver commemorative coins (e.g. the Belgian €10 European 
Expansion coin).

Her name appeared on postage stamps celebrating the Council of Europe, which 
were first issued in 1956.

The second series of euro banknotes is known as the Europa Series and bears her 
likeness in the watermark and hologram.

For the record, from Lewis and Short:

Eurōpa, ae, and Eurōpe, ēs, f., = Εὐρώπη.
 
USAGE I 
 
Daughter of the Phoenician king Agenor, sister of Cadmus, and mother of 
Sarpedon and Minos by Jupiter, who, under the form of a bull, carried her off 
to Crete, Ov. M. 2, 836 sq.; Hyg. Fab. 155; 178; nom. Europe, Hor. C. 3, 27, 
25; 57; Prop. 2, 28, 52; gen. Europae, Mel. 2, 7, 12; acc.Europen, Ov. A. A. 1, 
323; Juv. 8, 34: Europam, Varr. R. R. 2, 5, 5; Ov. H. 4, 55.—   2    Poet. 
transf., the portico in the Field of Mars, which was adorned with a painting 
representing the rape of Europa, Mart. 2, 14; 3, 20; cf. id. 11, 1.—
   B Hence, Eurō-paeus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Europa: dux, i. e. 
Minos, Ov. M. 8, 23.—
 
USAGE II 
 
The continent of Europe, named after her; usual form Europa, Mel. 1, 3, 1 et 
saep.; Mart. Cap. 6, § 662; Plin. 3 prooem. § 3; 3, 1, 1, § 5; 4, 23, 37, § 121 
et saepiss.: Europe, Mel. 1, 2, 1; 2, 1, 1; acc. Europen, id. 1, 1, 6; 2, 6, 9; 
Hor. C. 3, 3, 47.—
   B Derivv.   1    Eurōpaeus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Europe, 
European: adversarii, Nep. Eum. 3: Scythi, Curt. 7, 7, 2.—   2    Eurōpensis, 
e, adj., the same: exercitus, Vop. Prob. 13: res, id. Aurel. 31.
Cheers,

Speranza

Other related posts: