[lit-ideas] Re: Environmentalism in Fourteenth century Japan

  • From: John McCreery <john.mccreery@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2017 10:11:32 +0900

This is a nice example of literati skepticism about popular superstitions, a 
tradition that in China goes back at least to Confucius remark in the Analects 
that a gentlemen participates in ritual as if the spirits are present and does 
not otherwise concern himself  about them.

John

Sent from my iPad

On Nov 3, 2017, at 22:57, Lawrence Helm <lawrencehelm@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

From the Tsurezure Gusa of Yoshida Kenko:
 
207.  “When they were leveling the ground for building the Kameyama palace, 
there was a great mound where  innumerable large snakes were clustered 
together.  They made a report to the emperor, saying these were the gods of 
this place.  His majesty asked what ought to be done, and they said that as 
the snakes had occupied the ground since olden times, it was out of the 
question to dig them up and throw them away.
 
“This minister alone said: ‘What evil can be worked by such creatures in 
imperial ground, when an imperial palace is to be built!  The gods are not 
malevolent.  They will not be offended.  All we have to do is to dig them up 
and throw them all away.’
 
“So they broke up the mound, and threw them into the oi river, and there was 
no evil consequence whatever.”
 
Lawrence

Other related posts: