[lit-ideas] Re: E. B. White -- an essay by Andrew Ferguson

  • From: "Lawrence Helm" <lawrencehelm@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 7 Sep 2017 08:25:10 -0700

I won’t add the to the implicative tangent inasmuch as my own thoughts have 
gone in a different direction.   E. B. White was about my age when he wrote the 
letter that Ferguson is referring to, and I was curious  about White’s failing 
eyesight, stubborn ailments and whatever it was causing him to have only half 
his wits.

 

In a Wikipedia article I read, “White died on October 1, 1985, suffering from 
Alzheimer's disease <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alzheimer%27s_disease> , at 
his farm home <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E._B._White_House>  in North 
Brooklin, Maine.”  That didn’t sound right.  Would someone who died from 
Alzheimer’s disease’s side effects be able to write such a cogent letter two 
years before his death?  

 

White’s NYT obituary, 
http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0711.html?mcubz=0  , ;
puts a more realistic emphasis on the matter:  “He had Alzheimer's disease and 
was 86 years old.”  White was a famous wit and might creditably write that 
letter to Ferguson with the half he had left.

 

As to Ferguson he says that he didn’t have the means to visit White.  Ferguson 
was almost certainly affected by the rejection of his hero.  Did it lessen the 
impact of the rejection to say that he couldn’t afford to make the trip?

 

From the previous (presumable) affection of White’s earlier letter, he has 
become “brittle.” That strikes me as a strange word to use.  Time has passed 
since White’s rejection and death.  Ferguson by this time knows that White had 
Alzheimer’s disease.  Would a person suffering from Alzheimer’s with half his 
wits be brittle in discouraging a young admirer from visiting?  Wouldn’t White 
be sincere rather than “brittle” in not wishing Ferguson to see the ruins?  
“Figure it out. . . Sincerely, E. B. White.”

 

Lawrence

 

 

From: lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On ;
Behalf Of Lawrence Helm
Sent: Wednesday, September 06, 2017 3:35 PM
To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [lit-ideas] E. B. White -- an essay by Andrew Ferguson

 

http://www.weeklystandard.com/writers-seat/article/2009520

 

On the occasion of being sent news that E. B. White’s saltwater farm on the 
coast of Maine was up for sale, Ferguson wrote the above essay.  He was 
influenced by White:  “when a writer grabs you young, he usually grabs you for 
good.”

 

I wonder if David Ritchie might have been influenced by White as well.

 

Ferguson wrote to White and White, being in the habit of answering all letters, 
wrote back.  

 

‘Anyway, [Ferguson wrote] a year or two after our exchange I found myself out 
of work, footloose, and broke. I reasoned that White, an octogenarian widower 
living alone and in poor health, would appreciate a visit of unknown duration 
from a young stranger with lots of time on his hands and no visible means of 
support. As a courtesy I dropped my friend a line letting him know I was 
planning to come see him in Maine—although planning was a deceptive word. At 
the time I couldn’t plan a trip to the grocery store.

‘This was years before email, and I had no idea the postal service could 
operate so quickly. Within four days an envelope was in my mailbox, with 
elegant pale blue lettering showing the return address in the upper left hand 
corner. “Dear Mr. Ferguson,” the letter read. “Thank you for your letter about 
the possibility of a visit.” After this uplifting sentence, the tone went 
brittle. He mentioned a couple of his stubborn ailments, including his failing 
eyesight. And then: “So here I am, one eye gone, half my wits gone, and you 
want to come and view the ruins. Figure it out. There’s one of me, at most, and 
there are ten thousand of you. Please don’t come. Sincerely, E. B. White.”

Lawrence

Other related posts: