[lit-ideas] Cato's Implicature

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Mon, 2 Oct 2017 20:55:13 -0400

Gibboniana

I haven’t been following this thread too closely, but when ‘peasants’ are 
discussed, I think of the feudal system, which would never have existed without 
the Roman empire.

I don’t know what Popper would say, but there’s something Griceian about Gibbon 
– or Gibbonian about Grice.

Philosophers of history – such as Danto – say that yes, there is the 
possibility of ‘historical explanation,’ but that this is often best understood 
in terms of the historical agent’s INTENTIONS (and actions, of course). 
Gibbon’s classic (if not Spengler) is often mentioned in this regard.

Gibbon’s intention seems to have been to entertain those who took the Grand 
Tour – and it is interesting that he wrote about the ‘decline and fall’ rather 
than a topic that interests me more, the “BIRTH,” since, well, Rome was a 
_republic_ before it was an _empire_ and I was always moved by Cato’s suicide!

But I disgress.

(And does Spengler quote from Gibbon?)

Cheers,

Speranza

KEYWORDS: Philosophy of History, Roman History, Explanation in History, Popper, 
Grice, Cato, Gibbon, Spengler, peasant. 

REFERENCES:

Danto, A. Philosophy of History.

Grice, H. P. Actions and Events -- Pacific Philosophical Quarterly. His 
analysis of the Roman who fell on his sword. 

Other related posts:

  • » [lit-ideas] Cato's Implicature