[lit-ideas] Carry On

  • From: profdritchie@xxxxxxxxx
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2022 16:25:47 +0300


One measure of travel today is how often your call is transferred to the 
Philippines. You know the drill, “First I must verify your reservation and then 
I’ll tell you “in actuality  that I cannot deal with that. Please hold until I 
drop your call.”  It’s like something out of Theatre of the Absurd, or a ritual 
the meaning of which we once knew. 

Ritual actions are less likely to change than the words that accompany them. 
https://liturgy.co.nz/why-i-kiss-my-stole
When the groom’s kepa blew off in wind he stooped, picked it up, kissed it. I 
recalled priests kissing stoles and later fell down a rabbit hole on the 
interwebs, finding out about what we kiss and what we tell ourselves about 
kissing. But during the ceremony I looked forward in my mind, wondering what 
the explanation would be for stomping on the glass. Surely there would be 
stomping?

At our own wedding this came up. My in-laws wanted glass- breaking to be 
included. “Why?”  I asked. “What does it mean?”
Father-in-law, “It’s tradition.”
Me, “Understood, but why do you do it?”
“To remind us of fragility.”
Opinion B, “I think it’s to show that once something is broken… actually I 
don’t know.”  
This was in the days before the internet so I had to go to a library to look 
into the issue. In sum I learned what I opened with here, that rituals and the 
words that describe or justify them can change at different rates. No surprise 
to anthropologists, I’m sure. 

So why was the glass broken this time around?  “To remind us of the fall of the 
second temple.”

If there’s a dominant tale in Israel it’s that Jerusalem fell and Masada fell 
and all sorts of woe followed. We have Flavius Josephus’ word for this. I need 
to know more about how historians of the ancient world regard F.J.  Very much 
not my period, but he seems one of our profession’s most influential voices. 
Here’s a beginning. 
https://www.haaretz.com/archaeology/2019-06-17/ty-article-magazine/.premium/the-myth-of-masada-how-reliable-was-josephus-anyway/0000017f-f6ce-d47e-a37f-fffeee360000?_amp=true

The ceremony was presided over/ delivered by the groom’s former commander in 
some hush hush unit of Israeli intelligence. ( I suppose all intelligence is 
hush hush. ). His introduction of the bride and groom to the audience was 
couched in the form of a report from the field, citing CIA and other sources.  
It was funny. He also composed a poem for the occasion. 

Somewhat later, after the ceremony, came that more universal and blessed ritual 
moment : the casting off of uncomfortable shoes.  The groom, clever man, wore 
sandals.

Travel reminds me of the math problems of my youth: A can’t eat garlic and 
likes beans, B normally has a preference for Greek food but today is in the 
mood for something like Chinese, C wants to eat urgently, D has begun to wonder 
where you get Manna. Given this information derive the best place for them to 
eat peas in accord with seventeenth century French fashion?

OK, not  *exactly*like the math problems of my youth, but close.

Did you know you can get brucellosis from unpasteurized cheese?  Malta fever.  
https://www.moh.gov.sa/en/HealthAwareness/EducationalContent/Diseases/Infectious/Pages/Brucellosis.aspx

Apparently it has been eradicated from Malta: 
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brucellosis. Highest incidence is in Italy, so ;
we could get Malta fever in Rome on the way home!

I know it’s too early for another Thereabouts, so I labeled this “carry on.”  
That’s what we’re doing, if Ryan Air permits. 

David Ritchie,
Headed toward Security

Other related posts: