[lit-ideas] Bob's Your Uncle (Was: The 3rd Marquess of Salisbury)

  • From: Jlsperanza@xxxxxxx
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Tue, 4 May 2004 16:11:25 EDT

D. Ritchie writes:
I levered in the phrase, "Bob's your uncle," meaning "a solution simply
achieved," often used ironically, because I read yesterday that its popular
use dates from the rise to power of Arthur James Balfour, he of the Balfour
declaration.  It was a meteoric rise to power helped in some measure by
"Bob," his uncle, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of
Salisbury.
Interesting. The OED provides no etymology, 
     Bob's (bob's) your uncle: everything is all right. 

and three quotes -- below. Spender's description of the expression as a 
'cockney' phrase suggests it may be a vestige of 'truncated' [Cockney] 
(rhyming) 
slang?

Cheers,

JL

-----

 1937 in PARTRIDGE Dict. Slang (ed. 2) 981/2. 

1946 S. SPENDER Europ. Witness 143 
He mixes up phrases such as â??Oh boy, oh boyâ??, with cockney such as â??
Bob's-your-uncleâ??. 

1949 â??N. BLAKEâ?? Head of Traveller iv. 60 
Three curves and a twiddle, label it â??Objectâ??, and bob's your uncle.
 

------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts:

  • » [lit-ideas] Bob's Your Uncle (Was: The 3rd Marquess of Salisbury)