[lit-ideas] "Beilaeufig gesprochen: Die Gegenstande sind farblos" (Wittgenstein, TLP 2.0232)

  • From: Jlsperanza@xxxxxxx
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Tue, 18 May 2004 19:25:40 EDT

We are consideing McEvoy's 'implicature':
         How green was my valley.
         ____________________________
         
         Ergo: my valley was not a _thing_.

                    (via Tractatus 2.0232: "Objects do not have colour.")

R. Henninge writes in "Re: How kitsch you can get" (and thanks for the etym. 
notes on 'kitch', by the way):
[JL] free associate[s] under the guise of German
etymology. In another thread, for instance, he is currently working over the
poor Austrian usage "beiläufig": at the moment he's forced the word into its
three syllables and has pinned a "loaf of bread" to its midsection, "lauf."
Implicatura: Don't go there if you want to retain your sanity (by-loaf-ily
speaking).
(In passing, at a pace so quick I can only speak roughly, approx.,
shorthand, off the cuff--toodle-oo--I'm late, I'm late--"lauf" is, by the
by, actually all about "laufen," meaning [got] "to run.")
Thanks for the tip.

On second thoughts, I did notice that 'lauf' cannot be cognate with 'loaf' 
(of bread) -- since, by Grimm's Law --, German words ending in '-f' correspond 
to English words ending in '-p' (cf. 'pipe', 'pfeipf'). So the cognate is 
indeed, "leep" (as in "run"). 

Incidentally ("beilaeufig gesprochen") I did not know, since R. Paul failed 
to mark this, that there was an umlaut in the "a" -- now corrected in the 
header.

Curiously, I tried "laufen" in the 'etymologies' search of the OED and it 
retrieved an entry, "loaf" (v., "to idle"), but connoting what L. Horn would 
call 
an "etymythology'. I append it below.

    From the OED
    loaf, v. dial. ("to spend time idly"). 

   "Lowell's conjecture (adopted in recent Dicts.) that the 
    vb. is ad. Ger. dial. lofen = laufen to run, is without 
    foundation; the Ger. vb. has not the alleged sense 
    â??to saunter up and downâ??. G. landläufer (= LANDLOUPER) 
    has a sense not very remote from that of loafer, but 
    connexion is not very probable.]".

Now, if 'lauf' is cognate, not with 'loaf', but with 'leap', it's still not 
clear to me in what [idiomatic] sense objects are colourless, for Wittgenstein?

Cheers,

JL



From the OED
loaf, v. dial. ("to spend time idly"). 

"Lowell's conjecture (adopted in recent Dicts.) that the vb. is ad. Ger. 
dial. lofen = laufen to run, is without foundation; the Ger. vb. has not the 
alleged sense â??to saunter up and downâ??. G. landläufer (= LANDLOUPER) has a 
sense 
not very remote from that of loafer, but connexion is not very probable.]".

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