[lit-ideas] Re: Armi ed armature

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "Jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 3 Mar 2016 22:50:22 -0500

https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/arm

'arm' and 'arm' have  different meanings. 

"These meanings", the link above notes, "have two  different roots: an arm 
with a hand on the end comes from the Old English  "earm", while the weapon 
arm is rooted in the Latin "arma", or "weapons."  

Grice found that this does not mean that 'arm' is ambiguous, since we have  
TWO lexemes here. 
 
But Owen Barfield disagreed. Unlike Grice, Barfield was a poet, and a poet  
can speak of a punning ambiguity of 'arms' as both limbs and weapons, as  in
 
our arms they are, they are our hands, 
in city or in town, 
may they possess the rights of man
without the despot's frown.
 
Barfield can claim that it is the punning ambiguity of 'arms' as BOTH limbs 
 and weapons in 'may they possess the rights of man' that may be taken to 
mean  different things (cfr. Grice, 'avoid ambiguity'). Here possession can 
be either  a case of holding on to (arms as limbs) or of forcibly seizing 
(arms as weapons)  -- cfr. the truth-conditions of '[They are] comrades in 
arms'. 
 
The New York's Metropolitan Museum's policy of labelling a department 'arms 
 and armour' ('armi ed armature', that is) is less disimplicatural,  
granted.
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: