[lit-ideas] Re: Aren't you glad you no longer have a Hitler problem?

  • From: "Simon Ward" <sedward@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 24 Jun 2006 18:15:03 +0100

So now you're a Hitler apologist, Lawrence. 

The last paragraph is the most interesting simply because they are your own 
words. 

"Hitler never argued that Germany was under attack other than by the Jews.  In 
regard to external nations, he wanted Germany to be strong so it could gain its 
needed living room."

So Hitler never said anything about the Bolshevics and Communism in general? 
And he only wanted to invade his neighbours to gain 'much needed living room'. 
Please Lawrence, don't say it's true, don't say you really are sympathetic and 
you think it's right to defend the man. Don't say you actually trust what 
Hitler had to say on his podium.

In a later post you accuse the Leftists in the 1930s of being the group against 
the war. Would these be the same leftists to went to Spain to fight against the 
Fascists? The same Leftists who fought in the streets against Mosely's 
blackshirts. 

Sorry Lawrence, but you're talking tripe.

Simon



----- Original Message ----- 
From: Lawrence Helm 
To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Sent: Saturday, June 24, 2006 4:17 PM
Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: Aren't you glad you no longer have a Hitler problem?


Ring any bells?  Nice try Simon: trying to find a parallel between Hitler and 
Bush rather than dealing with the obvious parallels.  But you are quite wrong.  
Hitler never argued that they were under attack - or rather not the sort of 
attack you imagine.  In 1936 on May 1 "once an international day of celebration 
of labouring people, now redubbed 'National Labour Day' - he posed the 
rhetorical question: 'I ask myself,' he declared, 'who are then these elements  
who wish to have no rest, no peace, and no understanding, who must continually 
agitate and sow mistrust?  Who are they actually?'  Immediately picking up the 
implication, the crowd bayed: 'The Jews.'  Hitler began again: 'I know . . . ,' 
and was interrupted by cheering that lasted for several minutes. . . ."

Hitler never argued that Germany was under attack other than by the Jews.  In 
regard to external nations, he wanted Germany to be strong so it could gain its 
needed living room.

Lawrence

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