[lit-ideas] Re: A viable theory of induction

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "Jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 09:42:29 -0500

A non-viable theory of induction in the turkey's. This is Baron Russell's  
famous example of the Thanksgiving turkey. It's an American example meant 
for  the Harvard audiences. The turkey knows that the farmer feeds him 
everyday. On  Thanksgiving Day morning, the farmer changes his mind, and rather 
beheads the  turkey. The turkey, according to Hume, fails to see that the 
Uniformity of  Nature is a cancellable implicature (not Hume's words).
 
Ted Hughes, OM, would ask, "Can a turkey theorise?"

A viable theory of induction is Kneale's. Grice loved Kneale because  
Kneale's viable theory of induction imported essential properties, or rather  
implicated them.
 
O. T. O. H., 'viable' is figurative.
 
It's from French viable "capable of life", from Latin vita "life" -able. If 
 there was something important the Franks did was to lose their language 
and  adapt Latin instead. Old Franconian is preserved in Belgium though, but 
they  don't have 'viable' theories of induction there.
 
Viable was first used literally of newborn infants (in Livy's History of  
Rome).

In a message dated 2/12/2016 8:48:37 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx writes:
“Few new truths have ever won their way  against the resistance of 
established ideas save by being overstated.” Isaiah  Berlin, Vico and Herder 
(1976).
 
Is he being influenced by Grice? Isaiah Berlin belonged to what Grice  
called "the right side of the tracks". Grice didn't. But Berlin surely knew 
from 
 Grice that Englishmen (true Englishmen) love an understatement. So his 
quotation  is meant to irritate the Englishman in Grice! (Grice calls an 
understatement an  'implicature').
 
McEvoy:

This quotation prompts the following thoughts on Popper's  non-inductivist 
theory of knowledge. First, some of the resistance to Popper has  taken the 
form of saying he has a case but it is overstated."

Or, rather, in Griceian jargon, non-implicated.
 
"A perhaps related ground of resistance is that Popper's approach leaves  
the fundamental problems unsolved or untouched. Second, far from overstating 
his  case against induction, Popper introduced his case in a very limited 
way - in  relation to science and the logical characterisation of 'the system 
of testable  statements'. From this, it would not have been obvious to 
everyone how  thorough-going was the rejection of induction at any level e.g. 
in 
terms of  human psychology, habit-formation etc. It would be easy enough to 
misinterpret  Popper's _LdF_ as offering an alternative non-inductive 
characterisation of the  'system of scientific statements' (where the system is 
depicted purely in terms  of deductive relations) but where this 
characterisation leaves untouched the  need for induction in producing and 
testing and 
evaluating theories. The radical  and revolutionary character of _LdF_ was 
thus not obvious to most of Popper's  critics who trivialised its results by 
interpreting them as a superficial  exercise within a very limited domain. 
Third, what 'LdF' sought to do was  explain the 'system of scientific 
statements' in terms of deductive logic  combined with 'methodolgical 
conventions' so 
to show that scientific method did  not depend on induction. Fourth, this 
was the opening salvo, addressing the  key issue of 'scientific knowledge', 
in an approach that denied any role to  induction in any form of knowledge. 
Fifth, it might have been better if Popper  had made this fourth point 
clearer in _LdF_. Sixth, the case for the position in  _LdF_ is twofold (1) 
there 
is no viable theory of induction - and we are no  closer now to such a 
theory than we were when _LdF_ was published, or than we  ever were (2) the 
non-inductive or hypothetico-deductive characterisation of  science is viable 
[albeit it offers no positive solution to the 'problems of  induction' but only 
a negative solution whereby induction is rejected  altogether]. On these 
twofold points, Popper's critics dissent. Yet where is the  viable theory of 
induction - or where is the evidence we are closer to one? And  where are the 
valid criticisms of the hypothetico-deductive method (once we have  
cleansed the debate of the many confusions that philosophers fall into when  
discussing these things)? Which takes us back to Berlin - for in the above 
story  
we may see the dangers of understatement or understating your case."
 
I think Popper's problem with induction (cfr. Strawson, "The problem of  
induction", last chapter -- otiose one, to some -- in "Intro to Logical 
Theory"  -- where he acknowledges "Mr. H. P. Grice" for all he has never 
'ceased 
to learn  about logic") is that he found it logically boring.
 
O. T. O. H., his falsification theory, relying on the asymmetry of  
existentially quantified utterances in the affirmative ("This is a black swan") 
 
and the boring and so unrealistic universally quantified utterances in the  
negative ("No swan is black; since, all swans are white"). Reichenbach 
re-fined  this with ravens:
 
i. All ravens are black.
 
ii. Except this one.
 
iii. Hey: that's an albino raven!
 
iv. So?
 
At Oxford, for many years, the only source of a theory of induction was  
Mill's System of Logic, which was required reading for the 'Greats'. Grice got 
 so in love with Mill that he would call himself "Grice to the Mill" when 
he  could ("and sometimes when he couldn't, too" -- Sir Peter Strawson 
quipped! --  Why is it that Oxonians have such a sublime sense of humour?)
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: