[lit-ideas] Re: A Griceian Easter

  • From: Donal McEvoy <donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2016 15:00:59 +0000 (UTC)

We must have been up and down, in and out, and in circles as John alleges, as 
well as in many another shape, on whether Popper is a meaning-philosopher i.e. 
a philosopher who bases his views on what makes 'sense'. [Grice and 
Wittgenstein being two kinds of meaning-philosopher, and with some philosophers 
after the 'lingustic turn' talking about philosophy as if there can be no other 
kind than meaning-philosophy.] We know that Popper disavowed that he was a 
meaning-philosopher, whereas others said he was [AJ Ayer initially maintained 
falsifiability was offered by Popper as a criterion of meaning]. Again and 
again, JLS treats Popper as if he was a meaning-philosopher, and again and 
again I set out why Popper is not a meaning philosopher and should be taken at 
his disavowal.
The latest example is:>Popper once said that in a class to students of physics, 
he said to  them:
 
ii. Observe!
 
Popper says that (ii) is meaningless.>
For anyone else following, Popper never said any such thing i.e. he does not 
say "Observe!" is meaningless - and certainly not in the context in which he 
uses it above. He does say the injunction "Observe!" led his students to query 
"Observe what?" (a query that could hardly be made if the injunction were 
meaningless); and that their understandable query points up the flaw in the 
view that we start our knowledge with observations, for observation is always 
from a point of view, and so the start of our knowledge goes further back to 
this point of view - but the point of view is always relative to some problem 
or other, and so the actual starting-point for knowledge is a problem, for 
knowledge is always knowledge relative to some problem.
The whole point of Popper's story is lost in JLS's account; its point is not to 
erect another dismal dogma of meaning but to illustrate the naivety of the 
traditional empiricist view that knowledge is 'observation-based' in that it 
starts from 'observation'/sense experience (when the term 'observation-based' 
was used in my earlier post, it was used in inverted commas to mark that it is 
being used without commitment to this traditional empiricist view).
Perhaps, after a decade or so of this, we should change this game to one where 
I continually interpolate Popperian terms and maxims into a supposed account of 
Grice's writings? Cui bono?
DL


 

    On Sunday, 27 March 2016, 14:47, "dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" 
<dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
 

 The Romance Languages (unlike, say, English) use a root for "Easter" that  
is actually Hebrew, and supposed to mean 'transition'. The first Christians  
found it difficult to apply the SAME conceptual analysis for 'transition' 
in the  Old Testament to 'transition' in the New Testament, but the Apostles 
(twelve of  them, see Quine, "Methods of Logic", for the logical form of 
"The Apostles were  twelve") constantly made this reference to 'pasqua'-1 as 
used in the Old  Testament and 'pasqua-2' as used in the New Testament. They 
were being Griceian,  of course ("Do not multiply the sense of 'pasqua' 
beyond necessity"). To specify  the _Christian_ way of using, a collocation is 
needed, and 'pasqua' "of  resurrection" is used. English is a completely 
different animal here. 
 
Since Grice was C. of E., the English roots for "Easter" and the invited  
implicatures of "Happy Easter!" (cfr. "Buona pasqua!") need to be  explored.
 
We are considering not just Grice (C. of E.) but Popper (not C. of E.). The 
 empty tomb, did it prove that Jesus had resurrected? Does 
 
i. Jesus's tomb is empty.
 
FALSIFIES?


In a message dated 3/27/2016 5:49:44 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx writes in "Grice's Good Friday"):  
"'[F]alsificationism' 
may be applied more widely than as a criterion of science.  (This point has 
been addressed many times in previous posts.)"
 
But not on a Griceian Easter! (And we skipped, by McEvoy's  request, the 
problem-solving strategies vs. conceptual analyses used by  Patrick to banish 
the serpents not long ago). 

McEvoy: "One way to  understand the position is that 'falsificationism' is 
fundamentally a doctrine  that is logic-based, not observation-based, and 
this logic holds much more  widely than in its application to 
'observation-based' statements like those  deemed 'scientific'."
 
And I would take
 
i. Jesus's tomb is empty.
 
as observational. It is, granted, negative in essence, and the use of  "~" 
needs to be used. Umberto Eco would say more about this, but he forbade to  
speak of him for some years! ("Jesus's corpse was eaten by jackals; he 
didn't  resurrect," some sceptics then claimed). 

McEvoy:

"Popper use  'falsificationism' as criterion for science by taking the 
purely logical notion  of falsifiability and allying it with a requirement of 
testability by  observation: so the statement "Here is a swan" is scientific 
if observation  could test were it otherwise than true."
 
Mutatis mutandis,
 
i. See: Jesus's tomb is empty. 
 
Popper once said that in a class to students of physics, he said to  them:
 
ii. Observe!
 
Popper says that (ii) is meaningless. "My students wanted to know WHAT to  
observe." Popper invites with this the implicature that observation is  
theory-laden (to speak figuratively).
 
McEvoy:
 
"This idea of 'test' is inextricably linked with the logical notion of  
falsifiability in that it is only a scientific test if there are test outcomes  
that could falsify the statement (i.e. if all test outcomes could only be  
consistent with a statement, the 'test' is not a test in any scientific  
sense)."
 
Hence my point as to (i) can become a falsifier. 
 
Tertuliano once said that he believed that p because he found that p was  
absurd. And Aquinas, an Italian, later would say that philosophy is merely 
the  'ancilla' of philosophy. So this is serious!
 
And I met one theologian who said schatology is a science (Cfr. Grice,  
"Philosophical Eschatology -- from Genesis to Revelation").
 
 
McEvoy: "Once we understand this, we understand what is central to  
scientific method - testing by observation and its "logic"."
 
But (i), "Jesus's tomb is emtpy" is OBSERVATIONAL, if not theory-laden.  

McEvoy:

"We can also understand that the more severe a test is,  the better its 
scientific worth as a test, and that the severity of a test is  linked to the 
extent to which test outcomes could falsify the theory, and that a  theory 
proves its scientific worth the better it passes tests along a scale of  
increasing severity."
 
Well, the theory here is the theory of resurrection. Let's symbolise it as  
Tr. Why did Ayer, a logical positivist, thought that all theological 
discourse  was unverifiable? And would Popper go on to say that, as per 
McEvoy's 
'witch  ducking stool', it is irrefutable, and thus essentially and 
ultimately  metaphysical?

McEvoy:
 
"But decoupled from 'observation-based' statements, falsifiability still  
applies as a purely logical notion. It can be applied to all statements
 
such as (i)
 
"e.g. the propositional content of a statement is always the same as 'what  
it rules out', and 'what it rules out' is the same as the class of its 
potential  falsifiers (i.e. the same as the class of what would render the 
statement false  were that class not actually empty; it being a necessary 
condition of the  statement being true that its class of potential falsifiers 
is 
actually  empty)."
 
Coincidental that McEvoy would use 'empty' seeing that we are analysing  
'Jesus's tomb is empty'. 
 
"In the case of scientific statements, this class must be testable by  
observation. But in the case of a non-scientific statement, the same logic 
still 
 holds: so strict determinism may be characteristised as the view that 
there are  no undetermined events [i.e. an undetermined event is 'what is ruled 
out' by  determinism], and strict determinism is falsified if there are any 
undetermined  events. Here the issue becomes non-scientific because, in the 
way this  discussion is usually pitched, we cannot test by observation 
whether there are  any undetermined events (for any apparent undetermined 
events 
may have an  unobserved deterministic basis)."
 
As in eschatology? Because there may be various explanations why (i) is  
true -- Jesus's tomb is empty, say, not because he resurrected but because his 
 corpse was eaten by jackals.
 
McEvoy:
 
"That is, whether an event is undetermined cannot be checked by observation 
 because nothing we observe could falsify its being undetermined.  Pitched  
differently, we can say Newtonian's physics is prima facie deterministic 
and  Einstein's physics is prima facie indeterministic - but this 'on the face 
of it'  does not settle the underlying metaphysical issue, as underneath 
Newton's  physics might be an unobservable layer of indeterministic events and 
under  Einstein's a layer of unobservable deterministic events (which is 
actually what  Einstein thought), where this layer characterises whether the 
system is actually  deterministic or indeterministic. As nothing in 
observation can falsify what  might be the case for the unobservable layer, 
nothing 
in observation can show  either that there exist any undetermined events or 
even that there exist any  determined events (in the Laplacean sense). [See 
Popper's 'The Open Universe'  for a brilliant treatment of these issues.] So 
all statements with content are  'falsifiable' in that they are false if 
'what that content rules out' actually  obtains. This does not make them all 
'falsifiable' in the scientific sense: they  are only falsifiable in the 
scientific sense if 'what they rule out' could  presently be observed."
 
Well, do not multiply the uses of 'scientific' beyond necessity? Why is  
theological eschatology not a science in Popper's view? Why is even Grice's  
PHILOSOPHICAL eschatology (the study of transcategorial predication) not  
'scientific' in Popper's use of the adjective? After all, "eschatology" ends in 
 "-logy", which most linguistic botanists (including Grice and Geary) take 
it as  the CRITERION of science. 
 
Grice loved ichthyology, and laughed at the idea, when analysing the  
concept of 'necessity', that we need 'ichthyological necessity'. But with  
'eschatological' we are in a safer terrain, we hope.
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 





------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html


  

Other related posts: