[LRflex] Re: The joy of the old lenses? - NOT!

  • From: Bille Xavier F. <hot_billexf@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "leicareflex@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <leicareflex@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2016 17:30:29 +0200

Your opinion is highly valued David.
 
I'm not sure that particular blogger is not just canning gathered public ideas 
to build his own article.
 
In fact, I have cross read the lens reviews and this blogger is  just adding an 
opinion on something he obviously had no hand on.
 
Just a thought however, the LEica M240 and now M262 are just M in which the 
film has been replaced by a digital sensor. In particular, this is true in 
M262, something the M8 should have been in first place but this is another 
story.
 
Now, you say that the older M lens are probaly going to trap and bounce the 
light on the sensor plate, creating ghosts?
 
Well, how to put it? for a 5K+ camera, well...
 
All I have seen as I admit it is a slight color cast when using the old lens. 
Films were made for daylight, mostly and lens were coated accordingly. Of 
course the old old lens were made to improve the BW pictures. We may see in 
Alex'image that the color filmed picture may lack of ... color.
 
All together, you are right, why not using lenses built for the camera rather 
thar the cross mix? 
It is like having film developped in slide chemicals, just the fun....

cheers.
#-----------------------------------
From : Xavier F. BILLE 
mail : hot_billexf@xxxxxxxxxxx
Maisons Alfort - France
 

 

From: dsy@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
To: leicareflex@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date: Sat, 26 Mar 2016 08:49:09 -0700
Subject: [LRflex] The joy of the old lenses? - NOT!

Good Morning, Xavier!

An interesting article.  But, I'm not sure it's a very accurate one. 

He picks models with very different noses and attributes their renditions to 
the quality of the lenses

He complains that  "Modern prime lenses fall below what’s natural" and then 
uses a portrait taken close up with a w/a lens, which will always give an 
unnatural view. (Note the 'bobble-head' look to the fellow.)

And he loves to uses diagrams that, to me, are not understandable.

So, an interesting read, but not, I think, a well written piece.

Now, I'd like to show you one of the problems with older lenses... when used 
on a digital camera.

Please take a look at this photo, before reading further...

http://www.furnfeather.net/Look/BeautySix.html

and note the blue "splotch" in the middle of what seems to be a b&w image.

This is a phenomenon of using older lenses, designed for film, with digital 
sensors.  You see, film has a matte finish, whereas sensors are shiny.  So, 
light can be reflected by the sensor, back to the rear element of the lens, 
and then back to the sensor and then back to ... well you get the idea.  The 
result is an overexposed section, in the dead center of the lens (this image 
has been cropped) that takes on the colour of the coating of the lens! So, 
the "splotch" could be purple or whatever colour the lens coating has. With 
the non-reflective surface of film, this is never a problem.  But, with 
digital sensors....

Now, before you go running off, complaining that this is obviously some 
cheap, off-brand lens, note that the image was shot with the Leica 
Vario-Elmar, 80~200/2.8.   A superb optic in anybody's world.

I have also had it appear, seeming at random, with other old lenses.  Newer 
lenses, designed for digital use, have different coatings, which (we hope) 
prevent this problem.

This flaw only shows in certain lighting conditions.  But I have images of 
you, Xavier, and Rose, taken atop the Eiffel Tower, way back in 2006, ruined 
because of infamous "Blue Splotch" appearing over Rose's face... and also 
shot with the Vario-Elmar.  (Hard to imagine that it's 10 years since we've 
seen you, my friend!)

All this having been said, I love to use old lenses... because I'm not afraid 
to focus them and because the offer the opportunity to find great glass at a 
very reasonable cost.  (Such as my super-Macro-Takumar 50/4, or my 55/1.2 
Canon FL series lens - purchased with an FT-QL for $15, in a thrift store.)

BTW: The Beauty Six camera, shown, is a 1950 folder, from Japan.  It was my 
dad's camera and is one of only two surviving examples known to exist in the 
world. It also has a bit of an odd history behind it.

See: http://www.furnfeather.net/Reviews/Beauty.htm

The old Beauty Six is also featured on the cover of my e-Book,  "A Brief 
History of Photography".

See: http://www.furnfeather.net/e-Books.html

Thanks for reading.

David.  

--
David Young - Photographer
Logan Lake,BC, CANADA
Webpage: www.furnfeather.net
Photography e-books: http://tinyurl.com/SS2SS-Books
 
 
----------------------

Good Day Flexers,
 
Alex Hurst showing the revival of one his cupboard gem lead me to share 
this article with you:
 
http://www.thephoblographer.com/2016/03/12/the-problem-with-modern-optics/#.VvaXN7n2aua
 
Although I am not sure that the blogger is not just packing in a few ideas 
colected there and there to buid an aricle.
Let's say that his reviews of lenses are smelling like it...
 
 What ever, it may enlight a few minutes of the week end.

#-----------------------------------
From : Xavier F. BILLE 
mail : hot_billexf@xxxxxxxxxxx
Maisons Alfort - France
 
 

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

------
Unsubscribe or change to/from Digest Mode at:
   http://www.lrflex.furnfeather.net/
Archives are at:
    //www.freelists.org/archives/leicareflex/
                                          

Other related posts: