[kegswindows] Re: Certification classes

  • From: "Kurt Mincin" <krmincin@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <kegswindows@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 23:46:48 -0700

Stephen, thanks for your reply.  I've come to realize that you're right.
From what you and others have said, I see that I need to update myself
before looking at certification.  My goal is to further my career by leaving
the grocery industry (cashiering)and seeing where I want to focus in
another/IT industry.

Thanks again.
Kurt
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Stephen Cox (MSN)" <steveco@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <kegswindows@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Monday, October 20, 2003 9:30 AM
Subject: [kegswindows] Re: Certification classes


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> Kurt,
>
> =20
>
> You didn't say anything about what your goals are. Why do you want to
> take the exams?=20
>
> =20
>
> Are you looking to gain more knowledge & skills to increase your
> abilities to perform the work you're currently doing? If this is the
> case I wouldn't waste my time with any of the Microsoft exams. The
> purpose of the exams are to document/certify your technical abilities.
> The MCSE courses will help prepare you for the exam but they really
> aren't the best way to increase your skills.
>
> =20
>
> Or are you trying to find a more permanent, hopefully lucrative,
> position in an Operations dept? If so having the MCSE credentials will
> help open doors for that might otherwise be closed but ultimately you'll
> still need the right skills to get the good jobs.=20
>
> =20
>
> Instead of focusing on getting certified I'd recommend getting as much
> technical training & experience as possible. Volunteering at your church
> and supporting your families & friends PCs is a good start. I'd also
> recommend checking out the technical training available at Lake
> Washington Technical College (http://www.lwtc.ctc.edu
> <http://www.lwtc.ctc.edu/> ). They have excellent extended education
> courses and one-year certificate & two-year associate degree programs.
> (This might seem like a step back for someone with a CS degree but it'll
> bring you up to speed on the latest & greatest in technology since you
> were last in the biz.)
>
> =20
>
> Oh, and I do concur with just about everything David said, especially
> the suggestion to get the Transcender practice exams when you're ready
> to take the tests!
>
> =20
>
> With a little training and experience you shouldn't have any trouble
> passing the MCP & MCSE/SA exams at all!
>
> =20
>
> =20
>
> Good Luck!
>
> =20
>
> =20
>
> -Stephen
>
> =20
>
> stephen l cox  <http://join.msn.com/>=20
>
> MCSE, MOUS, A+,=20
>
> Operations Administrator
> MSN Subscriptions Services
>
> =20
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: kegswindows-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:kegswindows-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of David Dodge
> Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2003 8:44 AM
> To: kegswindows@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [kegswindows] Re: Certification classes
>
> =20
>
> Kurt,
>
> Most of Microsoft's certifications are focused at professionals that do
>
> network and server support on a daily basis.  If you have not touched
>
> Windows 2000 server and are reasonably familiar with it, what you
>
> suggest is very difficult(and relatively expensive).  The server test
>
> alone is a 2 hour test.  The other tests range from 50 minutes to 90
>
> minutes and are also comparatively brutal. =20
>
> =20
>
> If you want to get your feet wet and get a sample of how Microsoft tests
>
> are, I suggest you take the Windows 2000 Pro or Windows XP Pro training
>
> classes and try taking the test.  This will get you an MCP (Microsoft
>
> Certified Professional).  This will be more useful to those you are
>
> helping now doing desktop support, will be less expensive and will give
>
> you an idea if you want to proceed further. The tests are not free
>
> either, at $125 for each attempt, it gets pricey for failing tests.  You
>
> might want to also get the Transcender practice test for the class you
>
> are taking as well.  These are very good practice tests.  They are
>
> designed to overtrain you, so don't expect to pass these.  If you score
>
> in the mid 700-800 range, you can usually pass the MS test. =20
>
> =20
>
> An MCSE or MCSA certification is not easy to get, but unless you have a
>
> critical job need to be certified, or have a lot of time and money to do
>
> the cert track, then I don't recommend you undertake the entire track.
>
> If you focus on desktop support, then the Desktop OS MCP may be more
>
> useful in the long term. =20
>
> =20
>
> //David Dodge//
>
> MCSE-NT4, MCSE-2000, HP ASE ProLiant/Windows, and HP Master ASE-SAN
>
> Architect =20
>
> =20
>
> -----Original Message-----
>
> From: kegswindows-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>
> [mailto:kegswindows-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Kurt Mincin
>
> Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2003 12:17 AM
>
> To: KEGS
>
> Subject: [kegswindows] Certification classes
>
> =20
>
> =20
>
> I want to take the MCSA classes at Bellevue CC but am wondering how I
>
> can know that I'm ready?  Am I right that the courses are meant for
>
> those who are or recently were in the IT industry? =20
>
> =20
>
> Though I haven't been in the computer industry recently, I have a
>
> computer science degree and 3 years experience in technical support and
>
> programming.  A little over a year ago I built the computer I'm
>
> currently using (and networked it with my old Win 98 computer).  In the
>
> past 12-18 months I've replaced a CD drive, reformatted the disk and
>
> reinstalled Win 98 on family members' computers.
>
> =20
>
> I'm also volunteering at my church, which uses Windows 2000, by working
>
> with the person who handles the IT needs.
>
> =20
>
> I feel that I can handle it, but I think it's smart to get counsel from
>
> those who have done it.
>
> =20
>
> Kurt
>
> =20
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> =20
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> =20
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> =20
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>
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