[jhb_airlines] Re: Last night on FPI

  • From: "Bones" <bones@xxxxxxx>
  • To: <jhb_airlines@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2005 18:26:59 +0100

Does FSMeteo have an option to kill data below a certain altitude?

In ASV there is such a button because so many pilots were hitting severe
wind shear when just flaring out that they lost control. Must have spoilt
many a long flight!

bones

-----Original Message-----
From: jhb_airlines-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:jhb_airlines-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Gerry Winskill
Sent: 29 September 2005 17:12
To: jhb_airlines@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [jhb_airlines] Re: Last night on FPI


With GA aircraft I never lock onto the ILS but fly it manually. In
heavier metal I use APPR, disable Autothrottle as soon as it has
stabilised on the glideslope, then disengage AP at about 3 to 5 DME.
Last night there was so much wind sheer on finals that ILS was having a
hard time. I switched it off, which was "interesting". I find staying on
the centreline, manually, when being bounced around, easier if I use 1.5
zoom.
 Luckilly, and I'm sure FS9 becomes less realistic, strong crosswinds
and windshear usually seem to disappear with about half a mile to run. I
wonder why?

Gerry Winskill
gwinsk@xxxxxxx


Bones wrote:

> The latter. All it is doing is sensing the localiser signal and
> turning towards it until any deviation is corrected. It will do this
> whether the wind is 20kts or 90kts (given enough time) and the final
> heading it settles on is irrelevant to its logic.
>
> The AP is good enough to sense the decreasing and backing wind as you
> descend and it will be making constant corrections to actual heading
> but it can get a bit stressed in gusty conditions. If the gusts are
> short and sharp - nasty for the crew and pax - but not long enough to
> displace you much from the centreline then the AP will cope quite
> well. It is the longer gusts (or wind shear) that make it work a lot
> harder.
>
> The weather was grim over quite a large area last night. Alex had
> nasty wind going into Valley and there was some awful wind shear
> approaching ROSUN around FL90 - as Tom and Gerry both found out that
> hard way. FSMeteo and the like do quite well in this respect
> considering they are only getting 30 min actuals. In real life this is
> the standard time between reports but it the weather is changing
> rapidly (it qualifies for what Met call a Significant Change) then the
> reports are made more frequently - in really bad weather being updated
> almost constantly.
>
> These Special Reports don't get transmitted. It takes about 15 min for
> a normal METAR to reach the big wide world and this is just too slow
> to distribute Special Reports. Instead it is the controller who will
> advise pilots of the rapidly changing situation - or it may go out on
> local ATIS if this is an automatic unit.
>
> If a front goes through then the weather can change very quickly
> indeed - and this is what happened at Manchester last night. The vis
> would have improved over 20 min or so but the METAR's jumped from
> 3500m to 9999m instantly. I'd been watching more up to date weather
> and I was able to tell Tom in advance that a significant change was on
> the way. Trouble is that I couldn't predict when FSMeteo or VATSIM
> would pick this up and change it in the sim..
>
> bones
>
>     -----Original Message-----
>     *From:* jhb_airlines-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>     [mailto:jhb_airlines-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] *On Behalf Of
>     *FrankTurley@xxxxxxx
>     *Sent:* 29 September 2005 08:49
>     *To:* jhb_airlines@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>     *Subject:* [jhb_airlines] Last night on FPI
>
>     It was a good session last night, I managed 2 hops, Aberdeen to a
>     wet wet Newcastle, and from there onto a wet, wet, Manchester. On
>     approach to Manchester the Baron's A/P struggled to hold the ILS
>     in that wind, which prompted a question for you experts from this
>     humble bean counter -
>
>     Is the A/P "smart" enough to be proactive in a cross wind and take
>     an appropriate heading, or does it just react to being off centre
>     and steer to get back on again?
>
>     Frank T.   JHB167
>



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