[jhb_airlines] Re: Last night on FPI

  • From: "Bones" <bones@xxxxxxx>
  • To: <jhb_airlines@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 28 Jul 2004 23:57:37 +0100

One of the truly useful early instruments to get onto the panel was the
Directional Gyro. Before that most aircraft were fitted with a compass -
and these dance around at the slightest excuse. During one of my
training flights the instructor failed the DG by locking it and told me
to fly on the compass alone - and that was a real challenge.

Another trick I learned from the early days was in flying small heading
changes - such as you get on a talkdown. For changes of less than five
degrees it is better to use a slight rudder input and yaw onto the new
heading. If you try and use ailerons you have to bank the aircraft and
then anticipate the point at which to level off again and this is a bit
too cumbersome for corrections of a degree or two..

bones

> -----Original Message-----
> From: jhb_airlines-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
> [mailto:jhb_airlines-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of gwinsk@xxxxxxx
> Sent: 28 July 2004 21:26
> To: jhb_airlines@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [jhb_airlines] Re: Last night on FPI
> 
> 
> On 28 Jul 2004 at 20:01, Bones wrote:
> 
> > You are right too - I could have given you a radar talkdown 
> if I had 
> > managed to set it up in time. By that I mean getting the airfield 
> > elevation to work out the heights on the approach and setting the 
> > screen up for the Sheffield approach region. The only 
> disadvantage of 
> > a radar talkdown is that the controller can't provide any 
> service for 
> > other aircraft at the same time because a talkdown is almost 
> > continuous talk.
> 
> And how d'you think the poor pilot would feel, not having 
> your undevided attention? The 
> more I think about it, the more admiration I now have for the 
> pilots to whom I listened. 
> Having now seen the inside of a Vulcan, it puts a quite 
> different slant on the view I had 
> of his reacting to the "turn left three degrees" 
> instructions. How the hell did they spot 
> three degrees, particularly when they were often descending 
> through turbulence? On 
> the other hand, I now know how little they could see, on a 
> bright, sunny day. Nor had I 
> realised they were controlling the beast, using a gear lever 
> from a 2CV!
> 
> Gerry Winskill
> gwinsk@xxxxxxx
> 
> 
> 
> > 
> > bones
> > 
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: jhb_airlines-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> > > [mailto:jhb_airlines-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of
> > > gwinsk@xxxxxxx Sent: 28 July 2004 12:54 To:
> > > jhb_airlines@xxxxxxxxxxxxx Subject: [jhb_airlines] Re: 
> Last night on
> > > FPI
> > > 
> > > 
> > > No!
> > > Gerry Winskill
> > > 
> > > gwinsk@xxxxxxx
> > > 
> > > 
> > > 
> > > On 28 Jul 2004 at 11:55, gwinsk@xxxxxxx wrote:
> > > 
> > > > Another good idea bites the duat!
> > > > 
> > > > So much for the logical approach. Wonder if disabling all
> > > GS sceneries
> > > > will have an effect?
> > > > 
> > > > Gerry Winskill
> > > > gwinsk@xxxxxxx
> > > > 
> > > > 
> > > > 
> > > > On 28 Jul 2004 at 8:25, gwinsk@xxxxxxx wrote:
> > > > 
> > > > > A very enjoyable session, last night. Definitely better with 
> > > > > more traffic. Sorry about the hiatus at Sheffield, John.
> > > Although I was
> > > > > getting DME readings, neither Localiser nor Glideslope
> > > were active.
> > > > > We almost got to try the GCA Talkdown! I've had a look at the 
> > > > > situation, this morning. I use Richard Maxton's Yorksire 
> > > > > airports scenery, which includes Sheffield, on bot FS2002 and 
> > > > > FS9. In FS9, the ILS at Sheffield works. In FS2002, 
> it doesn't.
> > > Rerouting FS2002
> > > > > to the FS9 source makes no difference. If I disable Yorks, in 
> > > > > FS2002, then all is well. How can this be? One final
> > > fling; I'll try
> > > > > the effect of layering.
> > > > > 
> > > > > Gerry Winskill
> > > > > gwinsk@xxxxxxx
> > > > > 
> > > > > 
> > > > > 
> > > > 
> > > > 
> > > > 
> > > 
> > > 
> > > 
> > 
> > 
> 
> 
> 


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