[jhb_airlines] Re: Heavy rain

  • From: "Bones" <bones@xxxxxxx>
  • To: "'Mike Brook'" <mike.brook@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 01:01:42 +0100

My fault - I forget to check the origin of messages and assume most are
on the JHB list. If you think it would amuse the group I'll include the
JHB list in this reply.

bones

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mike Brook [mailto:mike.brook@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx] 
> Sent: 10 August 2004 19:07
> To: bones@xxxxxxx
> Subject: RE: Heavy rain
> 
> 
> Bones -
> 
> That is some story!  I posted to you privately and you 
> replied privately - the story is too good to be kept to 
> ourselves, why don't you forward your reply to me on to the 
> JHB List for their entertainment?
> 
> Cheers
> MikeB
> 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Bones [mailto:bones@xxxxxxx]
> > Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2004 6:00 PM
> > To: 'Mike Brook'
> > Subject: RE: Heavy rain
> >
> >
> > I can relate to that. Bad weather flying isn't just
> > wandering into cloud
> > with a few bumps thrown in for bad luck. If it all goes
> > wrong you can
> > end up with rain so solid you wonder how the engine keeps 
> going - and
> > rapidly filling up the footwells of the aircraft. Or you
> > can encounter
> > turbulence so bad that you can be literally fighting for
> > existence.
> >
> > In the latter case we had flown a PA28 (G-BUMP was the rather 
> > inappropriate registration) over to Belfast on a scuddy low 
> cloud day.
> > It was bumpy on the way there - I mean bumpy as in being
> > crushed into
> > the roof or floor if seatbelts had not been extra tight.
> > Any hand not on
> > the controls would dance in front of your face during this
> > turbulence
> > and changing radio frequencies was a very difficult
> > operation. It's not
> > just physically uncomfortable - it becomes very difficult
> > to perform
> > simple operations with hands and feet regularly being thrown around
> > against your will or ability to stop them. On this trip
> > the turbulence
> > was mostly up/down and it was just annoying - we got to
> > Belfast OK if a
> > little drained.
> >
> > An hour later saw us on the way back with weather slightly improved 
> > (wind down a notch or two and gaps in the cloud) but we were totally
> > unprepared for the next 20 minutes. Almost as soon as we
> > crossed the
> > coast the turbulence became malicious. It was no longer
> > just lumpy but
> > had developed some rotor effects as well. The aircraft was
> > hit by wind
> > sheers that threw it in any direction but also rolled or
> > pitched us as
> > well. It became a complete mental and physical fight just
> > to keep the
> > aircraft on an even keel - and it was a real battle.
> >
> > The first thing I recall is the physical effort just to prevent your
> > body from being thrown around. Despite seat belts being as tight as
> > possibly you had little control over your arms and legs.
> > The only way to
> > stop your arms from flying about was to hold on to the
> > yoke with both
> > hands - and then you wondered how it was coping with the
> > sudden loads on
> > it when you were badly thrown about. Arms weigh quite a bit and you
> > could feel that thin yoke tube being crushed against its bearing.
> >
> > Second was the battle to keep the aircraft vaguely
> > upright. You forgot
> > all about height and speed as these were varying too much
> > to control.
> > The aircraft would start to roll rapidly and full aileron 
> only partly
> > stopped the rolling - so full rudder was then applied to
> > assist. Then it
> > would flick in the opposite direction and you had to
> > reverse controls -
> > but with care as you could feel the loads on them and dare
> > not subject
> > them to too much abuse. Pitch wasn't so important and I
> > let the aircraft
> > do what it wanted too most of the time unless speed became
> > too slow. It
> > was physically exhausting.
> >
> > Third was the high demand on mental processes.
> > Concentration not only
> > had to be on controlling the aircraft but also on the few 
> instruments
> > that made any sense. The AH was the only dial that was of
> > any value most
> > of the time and it was essential when visual contact was
> > poor - we were
> > constantly running in and out of scuddy cloud. You ignored
> > the fact that
> > you were perspiring like mad except to wipe it out of your
> > eyes and your
> > body ached for relief. You ignored the fact that you had
> > no idea if you
> > were anywhere near your intended track or not. You ignored
> > the stuff
> > flying around the aircraft from time to time (good job we
> > didn't have
> > any flight bags on the back seats).
> >
> > Then it stopped. There wasn't any defining moment like bursting out 
> > into sunshine or symphonic music reaching a crescendo - it just
> > stopped. We
> > were still in scuddy cloud, roughly on track and sitting
> > in cold and
> > clammy clothes, going slightly smelly. The wind at EGNS
> > was 250/15 - not
> > much different from the wind at Belfast as we left. What
> > caused that
> > nasty bit in between I'll never know.
> >
> > A few years later when flying at night into Woodford from 
> Prestwick we
> > caught an equally nasty turbulence pocket as we were
> > positioning round
> > onto final for 25 - no doubt some roll effect coming off
> > the Pennines.
> > The Chieftain did everything but turn upside down during
> > the 15nm or so
> > we were in this stuff. At one stage I was reaching out to change to
> > Woodford Approach and the downdraft made my arm hit the
> > roof - knocking
> > on a fuel pump and some lights in the process. <g>  It's
> > this lack of
> > control of your extremities that can be very wearing..
> >
> > I'm sure other real pilots here can bring similar
> > experience to mind..
> >
> > bones
> >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: Mike Brook [mailto:mike.brook@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
> > > Sent: 10 August 2004 10:33
> > > To: John Woodside
> > > Subject: Heavy rain
> > >
> > >
> > > Bones -
> > >
> > > In view of the awful weather at the moment I thought that 
> you might 
> > > like to read the attached which was posted by John 
> Rossetti (ex-BA 
> > > Training Captain, ex-Concord pilot etc etc) on the UKScenery List 
> > > today apropos light aircraft flying in bad weather.  It makes 
> > > interesting reading...
> > >
> > > Cheers
> > > MikeB
> > > JHB193
> > >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: owner-ukscenery@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> > > [mailto:owner-ukscenery@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of
> > John Rossetti
> > > Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2004 3:05 AM
> > > To: ukscenery@xxxxxxxxxx
> > > Subject: RE: ukscenery: Heavy rain
> > >
> > >
> > > You don't even consider going there!
> > >
> > > Mike Hmmmmmmm, as it appens,,,,
> > >
> > > Last Thursday, a fiend ,yes fiend, of mine said would I mind if I 
> > > came and sat RH seat with him, for some rough weather experience. 
> > > This partly came about because I said, that in the absence of a 
> > > simulator for PPL's, he really should get to know what being in 
> > > rough weather was all about, at least ATPL's can go on a 
> simulator, 
> > > so a SHORT flight from Goodwood, around the IOW, (to experience 
> > > thermals and wind
> > > shear) was planned.
> > >
> > > Three hours later... somewhere over Dover at 1000' ( I like the 
> > > coast when we are that low) he decides that its not fun 
> any more and 
> > > as we cant see anything in any direction, only a rapidly 
> diminishing 
> > > vis of the ground below, he said, "ok, you have control, I've had 
> > > enough". Low level radar knew of our situation some time ago and 
> > > were handling us and a couple of other VFR's vectoring us 
> 'around' 
> > > ha ha, the storms that had popped up from the SW a bit 
> faster than 
> > > the met thought. We could not go West (back to
> > > Goodwood) or North to Manston (not wishing to land on Grass)
> > > so we are advised to make for France, which is a bit of a
> > > pain if you don't know the area, as they shoot at you if you
> > > go near certain things these days. I decided I didn't like
> > > that idea, and although the Storms had reached West London, I
> > > checked to see if Southend would take us, bless them they
> > > could if we hurried up ! with a 28kt cross wind we headed
> > > North over the Thames, with the most orrible storm I have
> > > ever seen on our left, the clouds looked like concrete walls,
> > > the light had almost gone, and I had all the maps around my
> > > knees, by this time I think there was more water in the
> > > cockpit than the rain outside, anyhow Southend found us with
> > > our transponder on and gave the directions for us to land, by
> > > this time the wind was 28 gusting 35, remember I don't have a
> > > licence anymore, and my friend only has 100 hrs and had lost
> > > it, but we were just able to make it, it was the crappiest
> > > landing I have ever made, I bounced more times than a tennis
> > > ball, but the worst moment was taxiing, when the thing tipped
> > > up on a side gust.
> > >
> > > I recommend that ALL pilots do it, at least once, hopefully, you 
> > > will never have (or want) to do it again.
> > >
> > > JR
> > >
> > > PS always take a sick bag !
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> 
> 


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