[ibis-macro] Re: [ibis-interconn] Re: A_gnd in IBIS 6.1

  • From: Walter Katz <wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "Muranyi, Arpad" <Arpad_Muranyi@xxxxxxxxxx>, <ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>, "IBIS-Interconnect" <ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 11:33:44 -0500 (EST)

Bob,



Here are all of the occurrences of “ground” in IBIS-ISS



On page 17



Nodes are the points of connection between elements in the input circuit 
description.  If entirely numeric, node numbers shall be between 1 and 
999999999999999 (1 to 1e16-1).  A node number of 0 is permitted but is 
interpreted as ground.  Letters that follow a leading number in a node name 
are ignored; this means that node strings such as '3n5' and '3' shall be 
interpreted as referring to the same node.

.



To indicate the ground node, use either the number 0 or the names GND, !GND, 
GROUND, or GND!.  Every node shall have at least two connections, except for 
transmission line nodes (unterminated transmission lines are permitted).



On page 36, Table 16 defines the “Argument” (aka “Terminal”) of T element




refin

Ground reference for the input signal.


refout

Ground reference for the output signal.



On page 39, Table 18 defines the “Argument” (aka “Terminal”) of W element




Lgnd=val

Defines val as the DC inductance value, per unit length for ground 
(reference line).

H/m


Rognd=val

Defines val as the DC resistance value, per unit length for ground 
(reference line).

Ω/m


Rsgnd=val

Defines val as the skin effect resistance value, per unit length for ground 
(reference line).

Ω/(m•√Hz)



Every place else, these arguments are called “reference nodes”.



I would recommend a clarification BIRD for IBIS-ISS as follows:



On page 17



Nodes are the points of connection between elements in the input circuit 
description.  If entirely numeric, node numbers shall be between 1 and 
999999999999999 (1 to 1e16-1).  A node number of 0 is permitted but is 
interpreted as the “simulator reference node”.  Letters that follow a 
leading number in a node name are ignored; this means that node strings such 
as '3n5' and '3' shall be interpreted as referring to the same node.



To indicate the simulator reference node, use either the number 0 or the 
names GND, !GND, GROUND, or GND!.  Every node shall have at least two 
connections, except for transmission line nodes (unterminated transmission 
lines are permitted).



On page 36, Table 16 defines the “Argument” (aka “Terminal”) of T element


refin

Reference node for the input signal.


refout

Reference node for the output signal.



On page 39, Table 18 defines the “Argument” (aka “Terminal”) of W element




Lgnd=val

Defines val as the DC inductance value, per unit length for reference line.

H/m


Rognd=val

Defines val as the DC resistance value, per unit length for reference line.

Ω/m


Rsgnd=val

Defines val as the skin effect resistance value, per unit length for 
reference line.

Ω/(m•√Hz)





This change totally removes the word “ground’ from IBIS-ISS, and uses the 
term “reference” consistently.



Walter



Walter Katz

 <mailto:wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx> wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx

978.461-0449 x 133

Mobile 303.335-6156



From: ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
<ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> On Behalf Of Bob Ross
Sent: Friday, March 9, 2018 10:10 AM
To: 'Muranyi, Arpad' <Arpad_Muranyi@xxxxxxxxxx>; ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx; 
'IBIS-Interconnect' <ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: [ibis-interconn] Re: A_gnd in IBIS 6.1



All,



To add to the terminology discussion, we link to IBIS-ISS and have adopted 
some of its terms.



In IBIS-ISS, Node 0 or alternative names are defined simply interpreted as 
“ground.”



Nodes are the points of connection between elements in the input circuit 
description.  If entirely numeric, node numbers shall be between 1 and 
999999999999999 (1 to 1e16-1).  A node number of 0 is permitted but is 
interpreted as ground.  Letters that follow a leading number in a node name 
are ignored; this means that node strings such as '3n5' and '3' shall be 
interpreted as referring to the same node.



When the node name begins with a letter or a valid special character, the 
node name may contain a maximum of 1024 characters.  See Table 3: IBIS-ISS 
Special Characters for a list of valid special characters.



To indicate the ground node, use either the number 0 or the names GND, !GND, 
GROUND, or GND!.  Every node shall have at least two connections, except for 
transmission line nodes (unterminated transmission lines are permitted).



For Touchstone files using the S-element, “reference” is used.






Argument

Description


n1 n2...nn

Nodes of an S-element. Three kinds of definitions are permitted:

n       With no reference node nRef, the default reference node is GND. Each 
node ni (i=1~n) and GND construct one of the n ports of the S-element.

n       With one reference node, nRef is defined. Each node ni (i=1~n) and 
nRef construct one of the n ports of the S-element.

n       With N reference nodes, each port has its own reference node. The 
node definition may be written more clearly:
n1+ n1- n2+ n2- ... nn+ nn-
Each pair of the nodes (ni+ and ni-, i=1~n) constructs one of the n ports of 
the S-element.


nRef

Reference node



Bob



From:  <mailto:ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [ 
<mailto:ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
mailto:ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Walter Katz
Sent: Friday, March 9, 2018 6:53 AM
To: Muranyi, Arpad;  <mailto:ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx; IBIS-Interconnect
Subject: [ibis-interconn] Re: A_gnd in IBIS 6.1



All,



As others have said, “ground” is for carrots and potatoes.



We need to go back to IBIS basics as an “electronic” representation of an IC 
Data Sheet. In Data Sheets  that name specific signals on pins as “Ground”. 
I have to except that this is the traditional way of saying that these are 
the reference nodes for measurements of signal (and other rail) pins. We of 
course now know that we need a nearby reference node, but 20 years ago 
nearby was someplace on the chassis. We know better now.



Unfortunately “ground” is in the vernacular of IBIS. Whether we call it 
“local ground”, “local reference” or “signal ground” we need to define this 
concept of how voltages are measured with respect to all of the voltage 
rules we have in IBIS.



We cannot get mired in some of the declarations that everything can be 
measured using Node 0, or that since some weird ECL/MECL/PECL/RS232 buffers 
that do not have a buffer rail or a pin that is a node that voltages can be 
measured with.



Here is an e-mail that I sent to Brad, which we should all read and 
understand:



Can we agree on the following, and then come up with words to describe it:



Voltage measurements are made between a point in a circuit (or node in a 
simulation) and a second reference point in a circuit. Where this reference 
point is located as near as possible to the point being measured.



The manufacturer of a component is required to specify these two points, and 
today he does that in a data sheet.



Data books tend to specify rules that apply to voltages at I/O buffer pins. 
The data book specifies signal names that are the reference voltage for I/O 
voltage measurements and the data book calls these signal names “ground” or 
rail voltage =0.



A proper voltage measurement at an I/O pin is made between that pin and a 
nearby pin that is called ground (voltage=0). Some components have multiple 
“ground” signal names, and the measurement (physical or simulation) must be 
made between the I/O signal pin and a nearby “ground or V=0” pin that is on 
the appropriate “ground” for that I/O signal.



All of this can be generalized to measurements at an I/O buffer which must 
have a reference point for measurements that should be local to the I/O 
buffer itself (e.g. ground_clamp_reference).



What shall we call this reference in IBIS and in BIRD 189? I prefer to call 
this “node” “signal ground”, since this is a well defined (search for 
“signal ground” in Google):

Signal ground is a reference point from which that signal measured, due to 
the inevitable voltage drops when current flows within circuit, some 
'ground' points will be slightly different others it protective connected 
earth. Chassis ground vs signal.Jul 16, 2017

We could also call this “local ground”, “local reference”, “reference node” …



As you say correctly:

“IC designers are among the worst offenders at applying global reference 
improperly and they will drag down the design community for years to come, 
at least until most their chips start to fail due to inaccurate 
 simulations.”



So what are we to do in IBIS. We need to be compatible with the way people 
have been building models for 20 years, we do not want to break existing 
models that  some long time IBIS “experts” have been insisting on saying 
this must be HSPICE node 0, but we need to also support what we agree is 
necessary to



You say that “IBIS has a chance to lead but we won’t.”. I disagree, the 
current BIRD 189 support the ability to make models that handle referencing 
of voltage measurements and correct handling of return paths – if the model 
maker chooses to use that capability. I think you agree that according to 
the current BIRD 189 specification you can generate interconnect models and 
power aware models in IBIS that handle referencing correctly.



All you need to say, and maybe we should make this more clear in the 
specification: The use of node A_gnd or node 0 should be avoided in order to 
handle power aware simulations, or some other more general disclaimer.



What would you suggest we do?



The problem with A_gnd is it contains the letters “gnd”. Might I suggest 
common up with a new name for a “Node” such as “A_ref”. In a beginning 
section of IBIS add a section describing that “ground” is not longer a good 
way of describing a node that is used for describing the physical location 
(point)  in a component or a node in a simulation that is the reference node 
for a measurement, and that since this reference point/node must be “near” 
the measurement point or node. We must rely on the model maker to define 
“near”. Any existing mention of Ground, GND, A_gnd or Node 0 must be 
interpreted as an appropriate reference point or node for the measurement of 
any voltage at the buffer, die pad or pin, and we must recognize that each 
location should have a different reference point, and these reference points 
are not shorted together in a simulation. I think we need to declare that 
all measurements within a single buffer must have a single reference point 
or node. EDA tools can do with this information want they want. Many tools 
will connect all of these reference nodes to a Node 0, which implies they 
are doing Ground Based Power Aware Simulations.



According to Scott McMorrow:



Actually, the syntax assumes that analog measurements are made outside of 
the package. As such, the the node 0 ground assumption is quite valid. Now, 
we can modify that assumption and determine that the model should be created 
at that boundary of the I/O cell, in which case the model is locally 
referenced.  But, in fact, measurement based IBIS models are created by 
measuring silicon in packages with the reference placed effectively at the 
ground balls, which is a summation over many paths through the package and 
die.



Circuit theory says that we can go from a partial element system where 
ground and power loops are fully modeled to a ground referenced system where 
node 0 ground is applied to every element in the path.  But, ground bounce 
inductance and resistance is then lumped into power circuit and signal path 
circuits, and the discrimination between the these is lost.  From a 
differential node voltage perspective at the receiver, the result is the 
same.  The voltage between the signal and ground will remain the same.  If 
there is a difference, then somewhere in the circuit, the ground partial 
inductance has not been reduced into the loop inductance for the signal path 
and power paths.



This is a pretty standard transformation from partial inductance/resistance 
matrices to loop inductance/resistance matrices, and is covered quite 
extensively in Brian Young's book, which is still the best on the subject. 
He's been at Motorola and TI.  I believe he's at TI now running their ASIC 
packaging group.



 
<http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Signal-Integrity-Simulation-Interconnects/dp/0130289043>http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Signal-Integrity-Simulation-Interconnects/dp/0130289043WalterWalter
 Katz <mailto:wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx> wkatz@sisoft.com978.461-0449 x 133Mobile 
303.335-6156From:  
<mailto:ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
<<mailto:ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
 On Behalf Of Bradley BrimSent: Friday, March 9, 2018 3:28 AMTo: Muranyi, Arpad 
< <mailto:Arpad_Muranyi@xxxxxxxxxx>Arpad_Muranyi@xxxxxxxxxx>;  
<mailto:ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx; IBIS-Interconnect 
(<mailto:ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx) 
<<mailto:ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>Subject: 
[ibis-interconn] Re: A_gnd in IBIS 6.1hello Arpad,For some but not all circuit 
simulators, “A_gnd is a local reference nodebut may be connected to Node 0 per 
user-configurable option”.As Walter often says … “a rose by any other name 
…”Best regards,-BradP.S.  Please notice no use of the word “ground” was applied 
and no smallcuddly animals or innocent plants were harmed in the generation of 
thise-mail response.From:  
<mailto:ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[<mailto:ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>mailto:ibis-interconn-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
 On Behalf Of Muranyi, ArpadSent: Thursday, March 8, 2018 11:17 PMTo:  
<mailto:ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx;IBIS-Interconnect ( 
<mailto:ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx) < 
<mailto:ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>ibis-interconn@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>Subject: 
[ibis-interconn] Re: A_gnd in IBIS 6.1EXTERNAL MAILSo, after all this, how 
should we define/describe A_gnd in IBIS?*       is it something global* is it 
something local*  is it a signal/power ground*    is it a chassis ground* is it 
an earth ground*  is it a reference*      anything else?Obviously some of these 
are nonsense, but (except for the last one)they were all mentioned in this 
conversation one way or another…By the way, if we want to call it a reference 
instead of ground, wemight want to consider a new IBIS reserved name for it:  
A_ref(just be consistent with how we would refer to it in the text)…Thanks,Arpad

Other related posts: