[ibis-macro] Re: Determining the reference signal_name of an I/O buffer

  • From: Walter Katz <wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <Arpad_Muranyi@xxxxxxxxxx>, "IBIS-ATM" <ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 29 Feb 2016 19:14:53 -0500 (EST)

Arpad,



I suggest you find out how S-Parameter measurements of packages and other 
interconnects are made.



Walter



From: ibis-macro-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:ibis-macro-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Muranyi, Arpad
Sent: Monday, February 29, 2016 6:39 PM
To: IBIS-ATM <ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: [ibis-macro] Re: Determining the reference signal_name of an I/O 
buffer



Walter,



I think this conversation is going in the wrong direction, and

as far as the original question goes (what is the reference of

the S-parameter model) it is really irrelevant whether the chip

has a GND pin or not.



Let’s review the original question again.  This time I will rephrase

it a little differently based on some of the conclusions we made

in the conversations so far.



If the package and/or on-die interconnect is modeled with an

S-parameter model which has as many ports as the number of pins

(or pads, or buffer terminals) on the device, what should be the

reference terminal of the S-parameter model connected to?  (The

way I worded this question implies that there are no more pins,

pads or buffer terminals available on the device for the possibility

to connect the reference terminal to it).



In one of your earlier emails you described how S-parameters are

measured in the lab.  Put a probe on a pin/pad/buffer terminal

that is being measured and ground the probe to a nearby, high

quality ground.  That high quality ground may be something other

than a GND pin/pad/buffer terminal of the device itself.  If this

ground connection for the probe is good enough, it may be combined

for all measurements as the common reference for all probe locations.

I would add that if it is good enough for the purpose, one may consider

it to be the node 0 “ground”.  In this case, the reference node of

the S-parameter model can simply be connected to node 0.



On the other hand, you can make the measurements so that the probe

reference is connected to one of the pins for all probe locations.

(This can be a GND, Vcc, or even a signal pin, although that would

be kind of a crazy thing to do).  In this case the S-parameter model

will have NumberOfPins-1 ports.



One of the examples we discussed, where the 4-port S-parameter model

only contains the signal lines of a differential pair, may be referenced

to anything if all of the probe locations are referenced to that one

location.  This could be a +Vcc pin/pad, a –Vcc pin/pad (or even a

signal pin, although that would be kind of a crazy thing to do).

But, as Brad pointed out, there is an additional problem with these

kinds of models, because the parasitics of the power and ground traces

has to be included in the signal’s model, but that is a different

question from where the reference terminal should be connected to.



So as far as finding data sheets for devices which do not have GND pins,

I think we are vesting our time.  That is really not the question here.

For the same reason, I think your proposed text really shouldn’t deal

with [Pin Mapping] and signal names or reserved model names to determine

what the reference terminal of the S-parameter model should be connected

to.  I think it should simply be connected to node 0, or any other ideal

DC voltage the simulator prefers to use.



Thanks,



Arpad

===========================================================================











From: ibis-macro-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
<mailto:ibis-macro-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:ibis-macro-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Walter Katz
Sent: Monday, February 29, 2016 4:23 PM
To: Tom Dagostino; mlabonte@xxxxxxxxxx <mailto:mlabonte@xxxxxxxxxx>
Cc: IBIS-ATM
Subject: [ibis-macro] Re: Determining the reference signal_name of an I/O 
buffer



Tom,



Thank you for find this part. Can you tel me the IC Vendor and a vendor part 
number so that I can look at their data sheet. Since they are measuring 
voltages, I would like to know how they indicate what is the reference pin 
for the voltages that are being measured.



Walter



From: Tom Dagostino [mailto:tom@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Monday, February 29, 2016 2:48 PM
To: mlabonte@xxxxxxxxxx <mailto:mlabonte@xxxxxxxxxx> ; wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx 
<mailto:wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx>
Cc: 'IBIS-ATM' <ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> >
Subject: RE: [ibis-macro] Re: Determining the reference signal_name of an 
I/O buffer



If you look at ECL chips you will find there is no GND in them.  There is a 
Vee and a Vcc.  One common way of connecting ECL chips is to have Vcc at 2V 
and Vee at -3.2 or -1.3V.  Enclosed is an example test circuit.  There are 
no pins with GND in this chip.  The input and output voltages are specified 
as Vcc – Xspec.



I’ve also worked with serial data chips that have magnetic coupling between 
the input stage and the output stage.  The output stage is meant to float 
with respect to the input.  Think about a communications link between two 
different buildings where there are two different “grounds” with distinctly 
different voltages on them.  We cannot state the output high voltage is 3.3V 
when measured at the input reference GND.  It may be 1,603V, or -2,163.4V. 
Yes, you can tie the two grounds together and you can have local “grounds”. 
But within the confines of an IBIS model GND1 is not GND2.  See ADM2486.



And while we are at it there is a whole class of other serial communication 
chips that generate their own voltages internally.  The parts are power by a 
3.3V supply but the output has to swing from say -5V to +5V.  There are 
voltage doublers in these chips with flying capacitors.  There is no hard 
fixed supply.  The output impedance of these supplies is not very low.



And there is another class of chips that  have internal LDOs built into 
them.  And I’m seeing more and more of these.  The pullup and Powerclamp 
references are not power supplies on the board.  For example in one recent 
part there was a single 3.3V supply to the chip.  Some of the output and 
input buffers worked off the 3.3V supply.  But other worked off an 
internally generated 1.8V supply.



And one chip recently had 3.3V and 1.8V supplies.  One set of output buffers 
could work directly off the 3.3V supply or they could be switched to an 
internally generated 2.1V supply.



One of the assumptions all SI simulators make is the supply can both sink 
and source current.  In a large board this works fine for SI purposes 
because there are enough current sinks on the board that any part whose 
power clamp is supplying current to the supply has a place for this current 
to flow.  But with these local LDO features any overshoot causing a 
Powerclamp to conduct will upset the local supply.  There is usually a pin 
in these LDO based chips to bypass the supply, but not always.



Regards,



Tom Dagostino



971-279-5325

 <mailto:tom@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> tom@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx







From: ibis-macro-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
<mailto:ibis-macro-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:ibis-macro-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Mike LaBonte
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2016 8:36 PM
To: wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx <mailto:wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx>
Cc: IBIS-ATM
Subject: [ibis-macro] Re: Determining the reference signal_name of an I/O 
buffer



I think we need to be clear at all times whether it is sufficient to 
identify a reference signal_name or if an exact pin must be identified. The 
first sentence of this goes both ways. One question is whether the 
parasitics of the interconnect shorting the pins associated with one signal 
together are small enough to warrant claiming that it wouldn't matter which 
of those pins were used as a measurement reference node. I'm not so sure, 
particularly if package parasitics are in play.



A potential conflict might come up with BIRD 161.1 Supporting Incomplete and 
Buffer-only [Component] Descriptions <http://ibis.org/birds/bird161.1.docx
. It has not yet passed, but it proposes allowing the first column of [Pin] 
to give pad names instead of pin names. At least in that case we would know 
pin parasitics were absent. But it allows says that a [Pin] section could 
have just one pin.



IBIS has always supported producing models from hardware measurement, but it 
is not certain that IBIS requires models to be expressed as though hardware 
had been measured when it wasn't. A quick search tells me I have 169 IBIS 
files on hand that do not contain the word "GND".



Mike



  _____

From: "Walter Katz" <wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx <mailto:wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx> >
To: "IBIS-ATM" <ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> >
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2016 12:08:20 PM
Subject: [ibis-macro] Determining the reference signal_name of an I/O buffer



All,



Continuing this thought, since IBIS is a component measurement based system, 
and since measurement are made at the pin of a component, and since every 
measurement at an I/O pin is made between that pin and some nearby reference 
pin, then all we need to do is define a method of determining the reference 
signal_name for every I/O pin. The following algorithm should work for all 
known existing IBIS models:



1.       [Pin Mapping] tells the bus_label on each of the buffer rail 
terminals.

2.       These bus_labels define the signal_name on each of the rail 
terminals.

3.       If just one signal_name is on a Pin with Model_name GND, and the 
values of the Pullup Reference, Power Clamp Reference, Ground Clamp 
Reference, Pulldown Reference assigned that has that signal_name has a value 
of 0.0V in the [Model], then a pin of that signal_name near the I/O pin is 
the reference for the measurements at the I/O pin. Similarly, the I/O buffer 
rail terminal with the reference signal_name at the I/O buffer is the 
reference node for measurements at the I/O buffer. Similarly, the supply 
pads at the die/package boundary near the I/O die pad are the reference for 
measurements at the I/O die pad.



If this algorithm does not work for an I/O buffer (and I claim such a case 
does not exist) then we can enhance IBIS by adding an option [I/O Reference] 
section that has two columns. The first column is the Pin_name of an I/O 
buffer, and the second column is the signal_name of the reference for all 
measurements at the I/O buffer.





Walter



From: Walter Katz [mailto:wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2016 8:58 PM
To: IBIS-ATM <ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:ibis-macro@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> >
Subject: One of the rail voltages of every IBIS buffer is a GND signal_name 
and a reference node.



All,



I have looked at the data sheets for parts with RS232, ECL, PECL and MECL 
buffers, and every one of them has one of the rail voltages connected to a 
Ground (GND) data book name (signal_name).



Although the IBIS standard does allow the user to associate all of the rail 
voltages with bus_labels on POWER pins, such a buffer is an unnatural act.



If we state that it is a given that every buffer has a Ground rail 
connection, then we can state that every buffer has a well-defined reference 
node for every other terminal measurement at the buffer.



I challenge anyone on this committee to find a part with an I/O buffer that 
has no rail terminals that are Ground.



Walter







Walter Katz

 <mailto:wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx> wkatz@xxxxxxxxxx

Phone 303.449-2308

Mobile 303.335-6156



PNG image

Other related posts: