[gpumd] Re: number_of_grouping_methods

  • From: Bruce Fan <brucenju@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: gpumd@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2019 15:06:02 +0200

Hi,

This parameter in the xyz.in file refers to the number of grouping methods
you will *define* in this file. It can be 0, 1, 2, up to 10 (?). I cannot
remember if there is a limit :-)

If it is 0, you don't need to write any group induces in this file. This is
the case for ex1, ex2, and ex3.

If it is 1, you need to add a group index for each atom (each line starting
from line 3), after the mass (assuming you don't have velocities here).
This is the case for ex4.

Someone also have used "2", which requires adding two group indices for
each atom in the following form:
  type x y z mass a b
Here, "a" and "b" indicate that the current atom is in group "a" for
grouping method "0" and in group "b" for grouping method "1". (We always
count from 0!) For example, in our recent preprint [arXiv:1905.11024
<https://arxiv.org/abs/1905.11024>], we have defined two grouping methods,
one used for the usual NEMD simulation (we need to define a group index for
the heat source, a group index for the sink, and some in the middle), and
the other for outputting the temperature profile in a greater detail (even
the temperature distribution in the heat source and sink). If you check
Fig. 4 and Fig. 5 of the above preprint, you will see that the points in
Fig. 4 are very dense (which are from grouping method "1") and the points
in Fig. 5 are very sparse (which are from grouping method "0"). In the
run.in file, we have something like:

  emsemble heat_lan 300 200 5 1 16  # this will use the grouping method "0"
by default
  compute 1 10 1000 temperature # the first parameter "1" means that the
grouping method "1" will be used here

Zheyong






On Thu, Nov 21, 2019 at 2:43 PM Florencia Carusela <flor.caru@xxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

Hi Bruce

Could you clarify me (may be with an example from 0-2) what this
parameter refers to? I think I am setting it incorrectly .

Thanks. Florencia

Other related posts: