[ezg] Re: [EXT]: Roof Materials for Tropical Exhibit

  • From: Sven Seiffert <Sven.Seiffert@xxxxxxx>
  • To: "ezg@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <ezg@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2021 16:10:46 +0000

Hi Stefan,

Thank you very much for your reply. Opal 
60<https://www.fordingbridge.co.uk/resources/faqs/> is a roof fabric that 
Fordingbridge in the UK sells exclusively. The material is mainly used in 
environments such as garden centres and public spaces.

My concerns about using the material are that it a) transmits only 60% of light 
(less if installed as a cushion); b) no data is available about the impact on 
photosynthetic active radiation (PAR); c) the material is designed to block UV; 
and d) unlike glass, ETFE and polycarbonate, the product has no proven track 
record in horticulture.

The manufacturer claims Opal 60 has been successfully installed on a Butterfly 
House in Scottland. Our experience at Whipsnade Zoo has been a very different 
one.

All the best,

Sven






Sven Seiffert
Curator of Plants
Zoological Society of London
Chair BIAZA Plant Working Group
Co-chair EAZA Zoo Horticulture
Regent’s Park
London NW1 4RY
t: +44 (0)20 7449 6521
m: +44 (0)7812 235598


From: ezg-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <ezg-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> On Behalf Of Stef van 
Campen
Sent: 19 March 2021 10:27
To: ezg@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [ezg] Re: [EXT]: Roof Materials for Tropical Exhibit

Hello Sven,
2 years ago I spoke with the architect of Paira Daisa, Pascal De Beck, he told 
me they are working on their new very very big tropical greenhouse. And they 
are planning to use glass, he told me it is a new kind of glass and it is UV 
permeable. I can’t remember which UV types….
Glass is much heavier then ETFE… you probably need a stronger construction…. So 
don’t know about total costs…

I do not know exactly what opal 60 is….. is it stegdoppel? (that’s the name in 
the Netherlands…) it is made from polycarbonate.

[Stegdoppel helder voor afdak serre en carport - huntingad.com]
Stegdoppel example

In Blijdorp Rotterdam Zoo they also have Galapagos Tortoise Exhibit, and I 
thought it was made from stegdoppel…. But I’m not sure at all, you could ask  
Louwerens-Jan Nederlof


Met vriendelijke groet,
Stef van Campen
Ontwerper
www.burgerszoo.nl<http://www.burgerszoo.nl>
Antoon van Hooffplein 1
S.vanCampen@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:S.vanCampen@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
6816 SH Arnhem
Nederland
Tel : +31 (0)26 44 24 534


[cid:image002.gif@01D71F2B.A3D68A00]<https://www.facebook.com/burgerszoo>
[twitter.com/burgerszoo]<https://twitter.com/burgerszoo>
[cid:image004.gif@01D71F2B.A3D68A00]<https://www.youtube.com/user/BurgersZooArnhem>
[cid:image005.png@01D71F2B.A3D68A00]<http://www.burgerszoo.nl/over-burgers-zoo/duurzaamheid/>

[cid:image006.jpg@01D71F2B.A3D68A00]<http://www.burgerszoo.nl/>
[cid:image007.png@01D71F2B.A3D68A00]  Denk aan het milieu voordat u dit bericht 
print
Van: ezg-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ezg-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:ezg-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] Namens Sven Seiffert
Verzonden: donderdag 18 maart 2021 19:33
Aan: ezg@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ezg@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Onderwerp: [ezg] [EXT]: Roof Materials for Tropical Exhibit

Hi all,

We are developing a new 300m² Galapagos Tortoise Exhibit at ZSL London Zoo.

The planting scheme consists of a range of tropical trees and shrubs, such as 
Coccoloba uvifera, Plinia cauliflora, Eugenia uniflora, and Calliandra 
heterophylla.

For similar previous projects, we have installed ETFE as roof material, which 
has a proven track record in terms of light transmission and spectral range.

The principal contractor for this project proposes using a bespoke fabric 
called Opal 60 to save costs. The material is mainly used in trade environments 
such as garden centres.  According to a datasheet it reduces transmission to 
48% and UV-T to 4%. What’s more, the marketing material states that the 
material cuts out UVA and UVB rays.

The same contractor replaced the polyethene skin on the Butterfly Exhibit at 
ZSL Whipsnade Zoo with a mix of Opal 60 and ETFE (the initial proposal had been 
to use Opal 60 only). As we came into autumn, the impact was that most of the 
nectar plants, such as Lantana camara and Pentas lanceolata, and some of the 
larger trees either died or displayed severe dieback. Interestingly, the 
observed impact coincided spatially with the Opal 60 and ETFE strips of the 
roof.

Based on the available technical data for Opal 60 and our experience at 
Whipsnade, I believe the material is not suitable for growing tropical plants 
in a protected environment.

At the same time, there is still a desire to achieve cost savings. I have been 
asked to evaluate a sample of the material to assess its properties rather than 
the manufacturer providing proof that it works for the intended purpose.

I’m aware of a basic range of lux values used to describe low, medium, and high 
light level requirements of indoor plants.

Does anyone have knowledge of more technical information or would be happy to 
share their experiences (good and bad) with roof materials in tropical exhibits?

Many thanks,

Sven




Sven Seiffert
Curator of Plants
Zoological Society of London
Chair BIAZA Plant Working Group
Co-chair EAZA Zoo Horticulture
Regent's Park
London NW1 4RY
t: +44 (0)20 7449 6521
m: +44 (0)7812 235598



The Zoological Society of London is incorporated by Royal Charter - Registered 
Charity in England and Wales no. 208728.
Principal Office England - Company Number RC000749 - Registered address 
Regent's Park, London, England NW1 4RY

This e-mail has been sent in confidence to the named addressee(s). If you are 
not the intended recipient, you must not disclose or distribute it in any form, 
and you are asked to contact the sender immediately.
Views or opinions expressed in this communication may not be those of The 
Zoological Society of London and, therefore, The Zoological Society of London 
does not accept legal responsibility for the contents of this message.
The recipient(s) must be aware that e-mail is not a secure communication medium 
and that the contents of this mail may have been altered by a third party in 
transit.

If you have any issues regarding this mail please visit:
https://www.zsl.org/about-us/contact-us<https://www.zsl.org/about-us/contact-us>

JPEG image

GIF image

GIF image

GIF image

PNG image

JPEG image

PNG image

Other related posts: