[ensu] Thu Feb 24 and upcoming IES/GOEHU Environment & Health Seminars

  • From: ENSU <utorensu@xxxxxxxx>
  • To: ENSU Listserv <ensu@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 23:24:25 -0500 (EST)

> Institute for Environmental Studies & 
> Gage Occupational and Environmental Health Unit 
> ENVIRONMENT & HEALTH SEMINARS
> (Abstracts for Feb 24, March 3 and March 10 are
> below)
>
******************************************************
> 
> THURSDAY FEBRUARY 24, 2005, 4:00 p.m.
> Room 113, Koffler Institute for Pharmacy Management 
> 569 Spadina Ave., at Bancroft Ave., north of College
> St.
> (west door on Spadina Ave. locked; please use east
> door) 
>  
> "PROTECTING HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES ('FIRST-RECEIVERS')
> DURING MASS CASUALTY
> INCIDENTS" (abstract below)
> 
> IRENA KUDLA, Clinical Occupational Hygienist,
> Department of Occupational
> & Environmental Health, St. Michael's Hospital
> 
> No registration required; all are welcome.  
> 
> For more information, please contact 
> Mona El-Haddad (416-978-6526;
> m.elhaddad@xxxxxxxxxxx) 
> 
> Please visit www.utoronto.ca/env/seminars.htm for
> abstracts and updates.
>
************************************************************************
> *
> ABSTRACT:
> The United States Occupational Safety & Health
> Administration (OSHA)
> determined that hospitals need assistance in
> selecting personal
> protective equipment (PPE) for "first receivers",
> hospital personnel who
> will handle contaminated victims of weapons of mass
> destruction (WMD)
> incidents involving the release of hazardous
> substances.  This led to
> the development of a "best practices" guidance
> document which outlines
> the role of emergency department physicians and
> staff in planning for,
> and responding to WMD events, while touching on
> emergency management
> planning requirements, PPE selection considerations
> and decontamination
> procedure recommendations.  This presentation will
> highlight a number of
> these "best practices" to protect healthcare workers
> who risk
> occupational exposures to chemical, biological or
> radiological materials
> when a hospital receives contaminated patients,
> particularly during mass
> casualty incidents.
>
************************************************************************
> *
> 
> REMAINING SEMINARS THIS TERM:
> 
> THU MARCH 3, 2005
> ROBERT PAEHLKE, Professor Environmental and Resource
> Studies Program,
> Trent University
> "ENVIRONMENTALISM, SUSTAINABILITY AND PUBLIC HEALTH"
> This lecture is a review of some of the connections
> between the analyses
> and actions of the environmental movement and public
> health outcomes.
> It will begin with the health implications of some
> traditional
> conservation and environmental concerns: air
> pollution, industrial
> chemicals and pesticides (and the food system as a
> whole). 
>     The larger part of the lecture considers the
> evolution of classic
> environmentalism into a broader green perspective
> through the adoption
> of the concept of sustainability.  Sustainability
> analysis, as discussed
> in "emocracy's Dilemma: Environment, Social Equity,
> and the Global
> Economy" Paehlke, R., MIT Press, 2004), is
> essentially the study of how
> societies might produce greater social well-being
> while gradually
> reducing resource inputs extracted from nature.  It
> is possible that
> extracting fewer resources from nature would have
> negative health
> effects if there were a decline in prosperity, but
> such a decline is not
> certain.  Sustainability analysis thus offers
> important insights into
> public health outcomes including the complex
> relationship between
> societal wealth and societal health, the connections
> between income
> disparities and health outcomes, and the health
> advantages of more
> sustainable cities. 
>     The lecture concludes with a brief look at the
> possible health
> effects associated with two very current
> environmental concerns: the
> long range transport of persistent organic
> pollutants (POPs) and climate
> change.  The latter effects are, of course, highly
> speculative but worth
> addressing nonetheless given the amount of time it
> would take to slow
> human induced climate warming without significant
> economic disruptions
> (that would in turn have very real health effects of
> their own).
> 
> THU MARCH 10, 2005
> MIRIAM DIAMOND, Professor, Department of Geography,
> University of
> Toronto
> "TRACING CONTAMINANT SOURCES AND POTENTIAL HEALTH
> EFFECTS: THE TORONTO
> EXPERIENCE"
> Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) body burdens in
> North America are
> 20 times that of Europeans and some "high
> accumulation" individuals have
> burdens up to 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than
> median values, the
> reasons for which are not known.  A study was
> conducted in which
> estimations of emissions and fate of total PBDEs
> (minus BDE-209) in a
> 470 km2 area of Toronto were made, using the
> Multi-media Urban Model
> (MUM-Fate).  Using a combination of measured and
> modeled concentrations
> for indoor and outdoor air, soil and dust, plus
> measured concentrations
> in food, exposure to total PBDEs via soil, dust and
> dietary ingestion,
> and indoor and outdoor inhalation pathways was
> estimated. 
>     Fate calculations indicate that 57-85% of PBDE
> emissions to the
> outdoor environment originate from within Toronto
> and that the dominant
> removal process is advection by air to downwind
> locations.  Inadvertent
> ingestion of house dust is the largest contributor
> to exposure of
> toddlers through to adults and is thus the main
> exposure pathway for all
> life stages other than the infant, including the
> nursing mother, who
> transfers PBDEs to her infant via human milk.  The
> next major exposure
> pathway is dietary ingestion of animal and dairy
> products.  Infant
> consumption of human milk is the largest contributor
> to lifetime
> exposure.  Inadvertent ingestion of dust is the main
> exposure pathway
> for a scenario of occupational exposure in a
> computer recycling facility
> and a fish eater, and can lead to almost 100-fold
> higher exposure than
> "average" for a toddler with a high dust intake
> living in a home in
> which PBDE concentrations are elevated.
> 
> THU MARCH 17, 2005
> RON STAGER, Environmentalist, SENES Consultants,
> Richmond Hill, Ontario
> "Emissions, dispersion and deposition modeling in
> environmental
> applications"
> 
> 
> 
>  

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