[ensu] Inst. for Env Studies Seminars (part 2)

  • From: "Matt Niedzielski" <mattniedzielski@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <ensu@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2003 19:05:52 -0500

Institute for Environmental Studies & 
Gage Occupational and Environmental Health Unit 
WINTER/SPRING 2004 ENVIRONMENT & HEALTH SEMINARS
***************************************************
Room 213 (**note new room**)
2nd floor, Koffler Institute for Pharmacy Management 
569 Spadina Ave., at Bancroft Ave., north of College St.
(west door on Spadina Ave. locked; please use east door)

No registration required; all are welcome.  

For more information, please contact 
Mona El-Haddad (416-978-6526; m.elhaddad@xxxxxxxxxxx) 

Please check www.utoronto.ca/env/seminars.htm for abstracts and 
updates.
************************************************************************
*
THU JANUARY 8, 2004, 4:00 p.m.
SUSAN TARLO, Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences,
University of Toronto 
"Indoor moulds and human health: current clinical and epidemiological
experience" (see abstract below)

THU JANUARY 15, 2004, 4:00 p.m. 
DOROTHY WIGMORE, Occupational hygienist, ergonomist and educator 
"Seeing the workplace with new eyes: an introduction to workplace
mapping" (see abstract below)

THU MARCH 25, 2004, 4:00 p.m. 
RONALD W. BRECHER, Principal, Globaltox Toxicology Focused Solutions 
"Hormesis:  when a little means a lot"

THU APRIL 1, 2004, 4:00 p.m. 
MURRAY FINKLESTEIN, Medical Consultant, Ontario Ministry of Labour;
Assistant Professor, McMaster University 
"Air pollution and neighborhood-related health effects" 
  

ABSTRACTS FOR SEMINARS IN JANUARY:
**********************************
THU JANUARY 8, 2004, 4:00 p.m.
SUSAN TARLO, Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences,
University of Toronto 
"Indoor moulds and human health: current clinical and epidemiological
experience"
Some human health effects of indoor mould exposure have been well
documented, such as allergic responses and less commonly, infections in
immunosuppressed individuals.  Other effects remain less proven but 
have
been questioned on the basis of animal data, effects found from
ingestion of contaminated foods, or epidemiologic studies of "sick
building syndrome".  This seminar will address the evidence for what is
known and what is based on epidemiologic associations. 

THU JANUARY 15, 2004, 4:00 p.m. 
DOROTHY WIGMORE, Occupational hygienist, ergonomist and educator 
"Seeing the workplace with new eyes: an introduction to workplace
mapping" 
Work organisation and the psychosocial environment are integrally
connected to many job-related hazards. Without a pollution prevention
programme, workers can be exposed to toxic substances (eg. latex,
asbestos) for which there are less "nasty" substitutes. Meatpacking
workers and secretaries repeat cutting and computer keyboard strokes in
awkward positions because someone else decides how fast they will work,
what equipment and tools they use, and when they get breaks.
    It's often difficult to "see" work organisation hazards, the things
that cause stress reactions. These hazards are increasingly common in
workplaces around the world, although they rarely are included in
workplace inspections, nor is there usually compensation for those
affected by them. It also means holistic solutions that recognise these
hazards usually not on the agenda when people tackle workplace health
and safety problems.
    Layered workplace maps offer one way to overcome these 
difficulties.
They use the techniques of geographic information system (GIS) maps, 
the
sociograms of Joseph Moreno to examine social relations, and the 
methods
of risk mapping that were originally developed in Italy in the 1960s.
    Participants will work in groups to make maps, followed by a
discussion of what they "see" and how these kinds of maps can be used 
in
different settings, including their research.


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  • » [ensu] Inst. for Env Studies Seminars (part 2)