[dance-tech] eVokability: The Walking Project?workshop performances in mid-June

  • From: sarah drury <sdrury@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <nbreyer@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>, <dance-tech@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>, alissa cardone <alissa@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>, Boston Cyberarts <info@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 27 May 2007 17:41:53 -0400

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
May 15, 2007
 
Contact: Sarah Drury
Telephone: 917-254-3468
Email: sarahdru@xxxxxxxxx
http://www.sarahdrury.net
 
eVokability: The Walking Project will present a first glimpse at an open
studio series at Dance Theater Workshop Studio this Spring.   Performers use
wearable media technologies to extend their movement and voices with
audiovisual images as they perform, exploring the body with disabilities vis
a vis the subject of ³walking.²
 
June 14, 15, 16  2007                                   June 22 & 23  2007
Dance Theatre Workshop Studio                 Spirit Wind Studio
219 West 19th Street, NYC 10011               213 New St., Philadelphia, PA
19106
 
Tickets $10/$7 students
Go to: sarahdru@xxxxxxxxx for tickets
 
eVokability: The Walking Project is a performance piece that explores ideas
and images surrounding the notion of ³walking,² vis å vis the body with
disabilities. Performers wear Costumes embedded with sensors that track the
shape and force of physical gesture, using these dynamics to generate live
media projections that amplify their movement. We have been working with
each performer to technically ³tailor,² her sensor-based Costume to her body
and her movement.  Each Costume functions as a media "instrument" that the
performer plays: a virtual extension of the body, a narrative prop. The
Temple Institute on Disabilities and disability studies scholar Carol
Marfisi participated in the collaborative development of the eVokability
Costume in 2004-5.  For The Walking Project, the current cast of performers
continues this process, developing a series of solo pieces that comprise a
full-length show.
 
eVokability Project Director Sarah Drury is a new media artist working with
language and the body through interactive narrative, wearable interfaces and
responsive media design in performance. Her work has been presented at
international venues, including: BAM¹s Next Wave Festival, National Theater
of Belgrade, the Brooklyn Museum, the Kitchen, SIGGRAPH, ISEA and the
Philadelphia Fringe Festival. Drury¹s work uses responsive media to focus on
questions of control, play and the emergent subject. This work translates
body gesture into audiovisual/textual language, in such diverse contexts as
electrical inventor Nikola Tesla¹s principals of induction (Violet Fire
Opera) and the projection of ³different² embodiment by performers addressing
issues of disabilities (eVokability: The Walking Project).  Sarah is
currently an assistant professor at the Temple University Film & Media
Art/New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration.
 
eVokability Performers include: Cathy Weis, celebrated dancer and
choreographer, whose provocative vocabulary of dance and media has evolved
alongside the effects of MS on her life; Shelly Barry, a South African
filmmaker, poet, and disabilities advocate whose video works eloquently
contemplate the crossing of global and cultural boundaries, from the
perspective of two spinning wheels; and Lezlie Frye, a spoken word artist,
scholar and disabilities activist who challenges social conformism and its
implications for people with extraordinary bodies, and the resulting
impoverishment of embodiment.
 
eVokability interactive programmer Seth Erickson has worked previously with
Sarah Drury on interactive media design for Violet Fire: A Multimedia Opera
about Nikola Tesla; as well as on projects for ZKM Center for Art  & Media
in Karlsruhe, Germany and on the Access Project, with Marie Sester.
 
Carol Marfisi is a writer and instructor of graduate level courses in
Disability Studies, incorporating the arts to explore the representation of
people with disabilities in mainstream culture and in disability culture.
She has been a collaborative partner on the eVokability Costume Project
since 2003, contributing insights and experiences about disability life from
fifteen years of active involvement in the Disability Rights Movement. The
author of numerous academic and creative writings publications, Marfisi
considers physical difference and disability as a creative device and a
means of enlightenment about human nature in general.  Carol is editing a
catalogue of writings by people with disabilities and photographic
documentation of the performances, to accompany eVokability: The Walking
Project.
 
Performers approach the subject of walking from the standpoint of a
question: what does it mean to walk?and how is it accomplished by those with
different bodies? Where steps and stairways can be insuperable barriers to
the world's most serious institutions and harmless pleasures alike, these
performers address this basic emblem of human mobility and empowerment.
 
***For press comps and other questions, please contact us at the information
above.***
 
 
   photo © Jacques-Jean Tiziou / http://www.jjtiziou.net
<http://www.jjtiziou.net>

   photo © Jacques-Jean Tiziou / http://www.jjtiziou.net
<http://www.jjtiziou.net>

   photo © Jacques-Jean Tiziou / http://www.jjtiziou.net
<http://www.jjtiziou.net>

   photo © Jacques-Jean Tiziou / http://www.jjtiziou.net
<http://www.jjtiziou.net>

   photo © Jacques-Jean Tiziou / http://www.jjtiziou.net
<http://www.jjtiziou.net>

   photo © Jacques-Jean Tiziou / http://www.jjtiziou.net
<http://www.jjtiziou.net>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 






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