CVTM - Re: Capital One Credit Card Holders

  • From: Brissa Childers <bchilders525@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "dirk@xxxxxxxxxxxx" <dirk@xxxxxxxxxxxx>, "frtm@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <frtm@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>, "cvtm@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <cvtm@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2019 14:31:26 +0000

Super helpful!

Brissa Childers

________________________________
From: cvtm-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx on behalf of Dirk Kittredge <dirk@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Monday, August 5, 2019 8:07 AM
To: frtm@xxxxxxxxxxxxx; cvtm@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: CVTM - Capital One Credit Card Holders



  *   106 million individuals had their data compromised by the Capital One 
credit card breach.
  *   A smaller number — 140,000 customers — had their Social Security numbers 
swiped.
  *   Security experts recommend taking a few immediate steps, such as freezing 
your credit and upping your security process.



If you're among the 106 million individuals who hold a Capital One credit card 
or who applied for one, your personal data — including self-reported income and 
birth date — could be in the hands of scammers. Experts recommend taking the 
five steps below to keep your finances safe.

1. Freeze your credit

Security experts are unanimous that a credit freeze is an essential step to 
protect your data and halt scammers from creating fake accounts in your name.

Freezing your credit at the three credit-reporting bureaus is now free, and can 
be done online or over the phone. You'll need your name, address, date of 
birth, Social Security number and other personal information, according to the 
Federal Trade Commission. Each credit bureau will give you a PIN, which you can 
then use to lift your freeze when you need to apply for credit, such as a 
mortgage or a car loan or a new credit card.

Here are the links to where you can freeze your credit at the three 
credit-reporting agencies:

Equifax<https://windstream.jiveon.com/external-link.jspa?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.equifax.com%2Fpersonal%2Fcredit-report-services%2F>

Transunion<https://windstream.jiveon.com/external-link.jspa?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.transunion.com%2Fcredit-help>

Experian<https://windstream.jiveon.com/external-link.jspa?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.experian.com%2Ffreeze%2Fcenter.html>

Security experts note that a freeze is much more effective than a fraud alert. 
Credit freezes don't affect your credit score, but they prevent loans and other 
services from being opened in your name without your consent. A fraud alert 
simply is a red flag alerting companies to the fact you may have been the 
victim of fraud.

2. Enable two-factor authentication

Adding an extra layer of security to your logins can help prevent scammers from 
gaining access to your accounts. The most common form of two-factor 
authentication is when a business texts you a one-time code that enables you to 
access your account.That means a hacker would need to have access to your 
mobile phone as well as your account information in order to gain access to 
your accounts.

3. Sign up for credit monitoring

These services can help you keep close tabs on your accounts, alerting you if 
someone opens an unauthorized account in your name or even another family 
member's name. Some sites offer free access to credit monitoring, such as 
WalletHub's free 
monitoring<https://windstream.jiveon.com/external-link.jspa?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwallethub.com%2Ffree-credit-monitoring%2F>
 of TransUnion credit accounts.

4. Don't get phished

Ignore unsolicited requests for information, which could be phishing attempts, 
or when hackers pretend to be a trusted company or individual, recommends 
financial site WalletHub. If you haven't been asked to be contacted, don't 
respond to the email, its experts say.

Capital One is asking that consumers who believe they receive a fraudulent 
email seeking their data forward the email to 
abuse@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:abuse@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>. After forwarding the email, 
the company recommends deleting it.

5. Change your passwords regularly

Consumers can also protect themselves by taking a step that most don't follow: 
Changing their passwords. And of course, too many consumers continue to use 
easy-to-guess 
passwords<https://windstream.jiveon.com/external-link.jspa?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cbsnews.com%2Fnews%2Fworst-passwords-2018-donald-joins-password-and-123456-on-the-list%2F>
 like "123456."

This email message and any attachments are for the sole use of the intended 
recipient(s). Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is 
prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by 
reply email and destroy all copies of the original message and any attachments.

Other related posts:

  • » CVTM - Re: Capital One Credit Card Holders - Brissa Childers