[cryptome] Re: [Cryptography] Are Tor hidden services really hidden?

  • From: John Young <jya@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: cryptography@xxxxxxxxxxxx,cypherpunks@xxxxxxxxxx,cryptome@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2014 14:31:58 -0500

"Also keep in mind that there are no confirmed on the record cases to
date of a Tor 'break/weakness' having been used to find a user. It
appears to be only user error."

One of the perdurable claims of comsec promoters is that comsec
breaks and weaknesses inevitably turn out to be user errors. Exactly
who the fictitious user is remains obscure but assuredly means
somebody other than the comsec promoter user who inevitably
offers a greatly improved product, trust them.

Tor is especially adept at blaming users, itself faultless except for lack
of volunteers to patch its innumerable holes (caused by clueless users),
so much so one might think that is a feature derived from the religion
of national security (actually that is its source and shows its heritage
of exculpability) which inevitably fails due to lack of funding, political
 will, public support, unwillingness of youngsters to die for officer
careers, that is customers must suffer for company profits.

Has there been a better account of inevitable exculpability for
inevitable comsec failure than that by NSA in 1998?

<http://www.nsa.gov/research/_files/publications/inevitability.pdf>http://www.nsa.gov/research/_files/publications/inevitability.pdf

Still hope continues -- thanks to Edward Snowden and his legions
of inevitable comsec failure promoters:

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  • » [cryptome] Re: [Cryptography] Are Tor hidden services really hidden? - John Young