[creation] Re: where to start

  • From: Percival Tanierla <percy_tan@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: creation@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2005 20:55:14 -0800 (PST)

Dear friends,

   I think creationists should  start teaching
Geocentricity= creation in the church instead of
schools. Let us teach our children at their  early age
about creation and geocentricity and when they go to
school they already have a good  biblical foundation. 
Each family should  be encourage to teach their
children  about creation and geocentricty. Every
evening  John (7 years ) read the Bible  and after
short prayer I tell them about Genesis 1- that God is
the creator of all things. I teach them God made the
earth for man and Christ came into this world.

  I have six children one is in college; one  in
elementary and  2 are in kinder  school. I pray that
when they grow older  God,s truth would be more real
to them.  I think this is one of the best way to
protect our children from error  and from deception.

   percival

   
--- "Dr. Neville Jones" <ntj005@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> I'm very happy with how this group has started,
> Marshall, and this posting from Jack is well
> pitched.
>  
> (For those who haven't already been there, Marshall
> has some detailed and interesting material on his
> website regarding the enormous amount that NASA
> spends on virtual reality -
>  
> www.fixedearth.com )
>  
> Neville.
>  
> Marshall <fefinc@xxxxxxxx> wrote:
> Good response on this important subject, Neville!
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Jack Lewis" 
> To: ; 
> Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2005 9:46 AM
> Subject: [creation] Virtual/created reality?
> 
> 
> > Dear Forum Members,
> > This item may be of interest to many of you
> especially Neville. I have
> scanned in a number of letters sent to New Scientist
> about concern regarding
> real/simulated data in the media and how to tell the
> difference.
> > Simulation signals
> >
> > From Chris James
> >
> > I strongly agree with Easter Russell (8 January, p
> 25). There should be a
> media code of practice requiring that all
> simulations, artist's impressions
> and so on are clearly marked as such. How authentic
> are the pictures of
> Titan we are being shown from Huygens? New Scientist
> could set a good
> example by stating when its pictures are not real -
> for example, that of
> comet Tempel i on p 28 of the same issue. Eastleigh,
> Hampshire, UK
> >
> >
> >
> > From Roger Taylor
> >
> > I agree completely with Russell, and the sooner
> the better. Modern imaging
> technology is so powerful, and presumably will
> become more so, that it could
> lead to all manner of fraud and deception, and
> ultimately to an Orwellian
> rewriting of history. This is not something we
> should tempt our politicians
> with. Meols, Cheshire, UK
> >
> >
> >
> > From Peter Strickland
> >
> > It is a mistake to think of films or photographs
> as real. When you take
> into account the choices that go into what to point
> the camera at and when
> to film, there is an enormous amount of subjectivity
> involved. Then there
> are choices about zoom, focus and aperture, which
> all affect what is seen
> and how it is portrayed. And then, of course, the
> resulting film or
> photograph will be edited, which will involve
> various digitally applied
> modifications, and, in film, choices about timing,
> sequences and so on. The
> difference between photography and digital imagery
> is more of a perceived
> idea about authenticity than any practical
> difference. Leeds, UK
> >
> >
> >
> > From Stu Witner
> >
> > Once begun, where does one stop, I wonder? For
> example, all images from
> the Hubble Space Telescope are "simulated" in that
> the colours are computer
> generated. The colours are not only beautiful but
> enable researchers to
> learn much more from them than if they were "real".
> >
> > Then there is the philosophical argument, "what is
> truth?", not to mention
> the obvious public taste for drama over reality. I'm
> afraid Russell may be
> tilting at windmills, 21st-century style. Seattle,
> Washington, US
> >
> >
> >
> > There was also an amusing cartoon which I shall
> have to describe in the
> absence of a method for posting.
> >
> > It shows an office with a sign saying 'ECONOMY
> SPACE PROGRAMMES INC.' and
> an assitant showing round a bemedalled, uniformed
> 'top brass' type
> character. In the office is an artist painting and a
> lady sitting at a piece
> of electronic equipment. The assistant is saying to
> the visitor,
> >
> > "Ron does lurid images and Sue does crackly sound
> effects".
> >
> >
> >
> > I wonder if any of these people have seen the
> video (available from myself
> on a CD) 'A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the
> Moon'. Check out
> Neville's website, he has beaten the letter writers
> to it!
> >
> >
> >
> > Jack
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
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> Release Date: 1/27/2005
> >
> >
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
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> 
> 
> 
>               
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