[CoMoDev] Re: NS Basic

  • From: David Beers <david@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <comodev@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 15:47:50 -0600

Hi all...

I'm very sorry to have missed the June meeting.  There had been a death in my 
family the night before the meeting.  All the stuff associated with that, plus 
work demands and an out-of-town trip put me out of commission for a while.

I'll do the Palm OS Developer Suite demo I'd promised at the July 27 meeting.  
I'm getting more of a chance to use it now and am very impressed with the 
Eclipse IDE framework it uses.  Actually, I've started using Eclipse for Java 
development as well as I explore the SuperWaba JVM that I'd mentioned earlier.  
More on that later.

Meanwhile I noticed this bit of news about a major new release of NS Basic, 
which as Dick pointed out may be another environmnet for writing apps for 
multiple handheld platforms without having to rewrite a lot of code: 
http://www.windowsfordevices.com/news/NS7089277875.html

David

On Wed, 16 Jun 2004 13:13:32 -0600, David Beers wrote:
> I've heard good things about NS Basic, but from what I understand
> it's not really for cross-platform development.  That is, you can
> use it to target different devices with the same language but not
> with the same code base.  From their web site:
> **********
> Why isn't NS Basic/CE just like NS Basic/Palm or Newton?
>
>
> There isn't any practical way to do this on handheld computers.
>
>
> These devices are all very resource bound. There isn't much memory,
> cpu speed or screen size. To make a product like this work
> efficiently, one has to make full use of what is available in the
> hardware and the ROM. The devices all have very different
> architectures. Cross OS compatibility has a real overhead cost, and
> there's not room for overhead on these devices.
>
>
> Futhermore, each unit has a unique user interface. We wouldn't make
> people happy if the applications they created for Windows CE looked
> like Palm apps.
>
>
> The BASIC language itself is pretty much the same.
>
>
> What we can do is stick with our core objective: make a development
> tool that is easy and rewarding to use. Add good documentation and
> support, and the family resemblance of the products is complete.
>
>
> **********
>
>
> On the other hand, those who like VB might find CASL to be an
> interesting platform for targetting both Palm and PPC from the same
> code base (www.caslsoft.com.  It's not exactly VB, but CASL
> (Compact Application Solution Language) will feel pretty familiar
> to VB developers.  I don't know how the speed compares to NS Basic.
>  It's basically an interpreted language, but with a wrinkle:  as
> with SuperWaba there is software that enables you to eliminate the
> runtime by compiling into a native executable.  Unfortunately that
> option is only available on the Palm OS side.
>
>
> I'm not sure how CASL handles the issues of GUI and resource
> differences between Palm and PPC: whether it tries to emulate the
> GUI of the platform it's running on or whether you end up with a
> PocketPC program that looks more like a Palm program on your PPC.
>
>
> David
>
>
> On Sun, 13 Jun 2004 16:30:23 -0600, dick_grier Grier wrote:
>
>> Hi David,
>>
>>
>> For VB programmers, there is another possible alternative for
>> multi- platform development.  NS BASIC from NS Basic Corporation
>> offers support for Windows CE (Pocket PC, including Windows
>> Mobile 2003), Palm (OS 5 and Cobalt), and Newton.  NS Basic is an
>> eVB (eMbedded Visual Basic) look-alike, though it offers up to
>> 25X the performance of eVB.  Demo versions are available for
>> download.
>>
>> I'll contact them to see if they have anything interesting to say
>> to us as a group.
>>
>> Dick
>>
>>
>> Richard Grier  (Microsoft Visual Basic MVP)
>>
>>
>> See www.hardandsoftware.net for contact information.
>>
>>
>> Author of Visual Basic Programmer's Guide to Serial
>> Communications, 3rd Edition ISBN 1-890422-27-4 (391 pages)
>> published February 2002.



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