[bksvol-discuss] Re: the symbols called braces

  • From: "John Simpson" <John@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 1 Dec 2012 14:59:10 -0800

The 'less than' symbol where the point of the sideways V points to the left 
means that the quantity on the pointy side is less than the quantity of the 
open side. For example,  3 <  5 means that three is less than five. The 
'greater than' symbol where the point goes to the right works just the 
opposite. The rule of thumb is that the smaller thing is on the point side at 
the larger thing is on the open side.

                                                                                
                       

  _____  

From: bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Cindy Rosenthal
Sent: Saturday, December 01, 2012 2:43 PM
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: the symbols called braces

 

Yes. that's what I'm saying--and I hope I'm correct. Offhand I can't think of a 
time I've ever used them. 
Oh--and I thought the more-than and less-than mathematical symbols were open 
arrows, or open sideways  Vs, i.e., imagine that capital V that I just typed 
resting on its side with the wide part opening as if to swallow the number; the 
problem is that I never can remember which way to point the V; maybe I'm wrong, 
though, and braces are used somehow.

On Sat, Dec 1, 2012 at 12:05 PM, Martha Rafter <mlhr@xxxxxxx> wrote:

Yes, if I use the shift and hit the same key as the bracket, I hear my JAWS say 
Left brace or right brace. A  Are you saying that if I needed to have two sets 
of brackets one inside the other, the inside ones should be

braces?  I hope I won’t need to use them!  Thanks!

Marty

From: Cindy <mailto:grandcyn77@xxxxxxxxx>  Rosenthal 

Sent: Saturday, December 01, 2012 1:59 PM

To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Subject: [bksvol-discuss] the symbols called braces

 

I'm pretty sure that  braces are the the things on the same key that has the 
bracket;,  and if you hit that ky plus shift  you'd get the brace: }  I'd 
describe it as a parenthsis with a little pointy thing  poking out from the 
middle. (Judy, hopefully you can do better. It would be used inside brackets, 
if you needed " bracket something else. You probably won't need it for 
bookshare  proofing but might come across their use in a book

 

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