[bksvol-discuss] First scanned book - Ward No 6 and Other Stories by Anton Chekhov

  • From: Rolph Recto <rolph.recto@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 20:40:31 -0400

Hi, I just completed the scan of my first book. Any feedback on it would be
greatly appreciated. Thanks!

*Title:* Ward No. 6 And Other Stories
*Author(s): *Anton Chekhov,  Constance Garnett (Translator),  David Plante
(Intro and Notes by, Introduction by)
*Copyright:* Barnes & Noble Classics 2003
*Publisher: *Barnes & Noble Books
*Brief Synopsis: *
Anton Chekhov invented the modern short story. With writing that is concise,
realistic, and evocative, he became a sort of photographer in words, less
interested in plot than in the subtleties of mood and atmosphere, and the
telling detail.
*Long Synopsis:*
Anton Chekhov invented the modern short story.  With writing that is
concise, realistic, and evocative, he became a sort of photographer in
words, less interested in plot than in the subtleties of mood and
atmosphere, and the telling detail.  His characters, always vividly drawn,
come from all walks of life and often seem to be caught up in a world they
don't quite understand.  Early in his brief literary career, Chekhov
outlined in a letter to his brother his idea of the ingredients of a good
short story.  Arguing against moral judgments and political, economic, or
social commentary, he wrote, "To describe .  .  .  you need .  .  .  to free
yourself from the personal expression.  .  .  .  Subjectivity is a terrible
thing. " Instead, he favored objectivity, truthfulness, originality,
compassion, and brevity.  Although his writing developed and matured, he
remained largely faithful to these principles.  This new selection of
twenty-three stories explores the entire range of Chekhov's short fiction,
from early sketches, such as "The Cook's Wedding" (1885) and "On the Road"
(1886) to late works, such as "In the Ravine" (1900) and "The Bishop"
(1902). Ward No.  6 and Other Storiesincludes some of his most popular
tales, such as the title story and "The Lady with the Dog" (1899), as well
as several lesser-known works, no less masterful in their composition.
*Categories:* Literature and Fiction
*Comments:*
I've read through all of the book and corrected the garbled text and
stripped the running headers; the only proofreading that needs to be done is
some spell-checking (note: it's mostly punctuation related) and bolding of
the chapter titles. Beware of the Russian names - they are quite exotic and
difficult!

For questions, email me at rolph.recto@xxxxxxxxxx

-----
Rolph Recto

Other related posts: