[bksvol-discuss] Re: A question re homonyms in context

  • From: "Estelnalissi" <airadil@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 05:13:31 -0400

Dear Robert,

I won't be the one to correct you. Look how systematic and logical your explanation is compared with mine. Thinking of triads in sentences is a new perspective for me. Very interesting.

Always with love,

Lissi

"My story is finally out there in the ether, a self-sufficient organism beyond my control, changing shape in every new mind that absorbs it."
From The Night Listener, a novel by
Armistead Maupin


----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Riddle" <captinlogic@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 4:31 AM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: A question re homonyms in context



Well, modern synthesizers use what are called triads to creat speech. FOr example,
My feet were made of lead.
I want to lead the batallion.
The synthesizer uses groups of three words, I want to lead, made of lead, to creat sentences and determine how these words are pronounced, leed versus led invalid versus invalid. It's usually consistant in it's pronunciation, but errors do occur in some cases.


This is of course just how I have figured it out, I am open to being corrected, though.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Cindy" <popularplace@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 1:23 AM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] A question re homonyms in context



In the book I'm almost finished validating, there is a
play on words--invalid, meaning sick person, and
invalid, i.e., in val id, meaning not valid. The
latter word is discussed, its meanings--but I'm
curious--how does speech, i.e., the Daisy reader or
whatever, distinguish pronunciations between homonyms
in texts. In this case, in val id is italicized. Will
the speech reader chnage the pronunciation from
invalid to in val id because of that? Of will it
pronounce both words the same and the reader will get
the difference from the explanation that is given.  In
other similar cases, does the speech reader read both
words however the first one happens to be pronounced?

Just curious.

Cindy

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