[baisl] Re: Classroom management strategies

  • From: Joanne Melinson <jmelinson@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: baisl@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2018 15:33:30 -0700

We work with 6-12th grade students at Sacramento Country Day School. I tend
not to give privileges for good behavior because that's really just an
expectation and not something above and beyond. Although I wonder if that
would be different with younger kids. However, I have been known to give a
piece of candy each time they come in for book talks. Here are some
strategies we use:


   - We rearrange the seating if kids are distracting one another.
   - Remind them to close their computers while I'm teaching (depending on
   what we're doing of course).
   - Involve the kiddos in a lot of the lesson to keep their attention. (If
   I'm going over something they should already know, I ask them to walk me
   through it. For instance tell me how I should add a new citation to Noodle
   Tools or walk me through how I would find an article in a database.)
   - Recap the lesson by asking them what they've learned making sure they
   hit the big topics.
   - If they're too squirrely, I'll have them get up and do the yoga
   warrior pose or stretch.
   - Here's a trick you can really only use once with each group. I reserve
   it for when I'm talking to my sophomores about citing sources, which can be
   tedious, but I really need them to pay attention. I tell them about how a
   small amount of dark chocolate can help you stay focused, then we pass
   around the candy while I tell them that I need them to stay focused for
   this lesson even though it's tedious because they'll need to use it for the
   project we're working on, but they'll also need to use it through the rest
   of high school and college. Things get serious; they focus; I teach. It's a
   beautiful thing. But you can't get that intense over every project so, as I
   said, this is one I only use once with each group of sophomores.
   - I sometimes look at them sternly over my glasses (this usually makes
   them laugh, but only a little, because they are getting the message).
   - I have a couple students that I remind that it's not the Obadiah Show
   or the Agamemnon Show (the names have been changed to protect the guilty
   parties, but I use their names).
   - I ask them to raise their hands to answer if it gets too crazy.
   - And because we have middle school kiddos, I realize that we're going
   to have some wild days, especially at 3 pm on a Friday, for instance!

I know that's not quite what you asked for, but I hope it helps. There's
also a book called *The First Days of School: How to Be An Effective
Teacher* that a few people on this listserv or the AISL listserv
recommended for new or even veteran teachers that has a lot about classroom
management, and I would recommend it also.

Jo

On Thu, Sep 13, 2018 at 2:50 PM, Judy Cha <jccha34@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Hi Everyone,

Does anyone want to share good classroom management strategies they use
with K-5th grade students, or with 6-8th grade students? Do you give
privileges for good behavior? If so, what kinds of privileges? How do you
motivate students to behave well during library time? I would appreciate
your responses and help!

Thanks,

Judy Cha
Granada Islamic School
Librarian




-- 
*Jo Melinson*
Middle/High School Librarian & Literary Magazine Adviser
*Sacramento Country Day School*
PK-12th Grade Independent Education
2636 Latham Drive, Sacramento, CA 95864
<https://maps.google.com/?q=2636+Latham+Drive,+Sacramento,+CA+95864+916&entry=gmail&source=g>
916.481.8811 <(916)%20481-8811> x341 • www.saccds.or
<http://www.saccds.org/>g

Matthews Library
https://saccdslibrary.wordpress.com/
https://www.facebook.com/saccdslibrary

Think Critically. Live Creatively. Act Compassionately.

Other related posts: