[ba-liberty] Re: libertarian analyses of license plate cams?

  • From: Starchild <sfdreamer@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: ba-liberty@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Tue, 21 Sep 2021 16:18:59 -0700


        I would note also that not everything that's bad for freedom is itself 
a violation of the Non-Aggression Principle or otherwise in direct violation of 
libertarian ethics.

        The collection of mass data on others (including video footage) by 
voluntary sector institutions or individuals not working for government is a 
good case in point. While such data collection is not itself un-libertarian, 
such data, once collected, may be turned over to government actors, whether 
voluntarily or otherwise, and then become a tool of oppression. It's worth 
considering in any given case, "What is the person or organization collecting 
this data likely to do if confronted with a governmental demand to turn it over 
to them?"

        I believe it behooves libertarians to evaluate laws, policies, and 
actions based not only on our traditional (and still very much valid!) 
questions, "Is this voluntary?" and "Does this violate anyone's rights?", but 
also, "Will this tend to make society more libertarian, or more authoritarian?" 
and "Will this do more to further individual rights and liberty, or 
institutional power and government control?"

Love & Liberty,

((( starchild )))


On Sep 21, 2021, at 3:48 PM, Jeff Chan wrote:

On Tuesday, September 21, 2021, 12:13:32 PM, Brian Holtz wrote:
Looking for pointers to libertarian analyses of license plate cams.

Example:
https://reason.com/volokh/2020/04/22/automated-license-plate-readers-the-mosaic-theory-and-the-fourth-amendment/

My default position would be:

  - owners of private property are free to record and share information
  that is visible from that property using "ordinary" means
  - private citizens using public rights-of-way are free to record and
  share information that is visible to them via "ordinary" means
  - organizations with police powers (e.g. governments, not HOAs) should
  not operate mass-surveillance systems, but can issue search warrants into
  such systems

I worry about government mass-surveillance, but I also worry about
"privacy" laws that give government the power to restrict what information
private individuals can record and share.

Hi Brian,
Those positions look generally reasonable to me.  I too would be 
interested in any formal libertarian positions/theory. 

To me, anything a private individual would be able to see in a public 
space should be ok to record, same as seeing it visually and writing 
down a note (or creating a memory) of what one saw, but arguably less 
fallible to human frailties such as cognitive biases and errors.

Government force, including police state surveillance, should be 
severely restricted by law and government should follow its own laws 
(it often doesn't; and "who guards the guards?"  Quis custodiet ipsos 
custodes? ).


That all said, the entire world is moving towards a police state and 
possible world socialist government police state.  China's massive 
surveillance system including facial recognition, etc., and "social 
credit scores" fit perfectly into that paradigm, which unfortunately 
is a template for most other governments.  And all of it fit's 
perfectly into Klaus Schwab's fascistic "Great Reset".  Please study 
and understand it. 

But perhaps the most insidious tool for government control over people 
are impending central bank digital currencies.  They are fully traceable, 
unalterable; a permanent record of every transaction and transactee in 
the formal economy; a perfect tool for police states to tax, track, 
punish, control the entire economic lives, cradle to grave, of 
everyone who uses government money.  And they are also outlawing private 
cryptocurrencies and cryptocurrency exchanges with the formal economy.  
All of this is in the public record, public legislation, etc., in the 
U.S., EU, China; it's not conspiracy theory. 

Sorry for going slightly off topic, but government (video and other) 
surveillance networks fit into this scheme perfectly, so it's not 
totally unrelated.

In Liberty,

Jeff C.
-- 
Jeff Chan
mailto:webmaster@xxxxxxxx
http://rkba.org/

"Switzerland exported democracy to America by being a shining, 
stable example of freedom which America's founders imperfectly 
copied.  It did not invade America and replace its government."




Other related posts: