[AZ-Observing] Re: Predicting Dew

  • From: "Richard Harshaw" <rharshaw2@xxxxxxx>
  • To: <az-observing@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 13:39:59 -0700

If you have access to a psychrometric chart, you can plot the dry bulb and wet 
bulb temperatures, and then determine the surface temperature of your telescope 
(probably close to the dry bulb). If the scope's surface temperature is below 
the dry bulb / wet bulb temperature intersection on the chart, you'll probably 
have dew form. That is the method we used in air conditioning design procedures 
to determine an ideal coil temperature for a given set of cooling conditions.


Richard Harshaw
Cave Creek, AZ
Brilliant Sky Observatory
Dedicated to speckle interferometry of close double stars…



-----Original Message-----
From: az-observing-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:az-observing-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Paul Lind
Sent: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 1:31 PM
To: az-observing@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [AZ-Observing] Predicting Dew

This morning I noticed large amount of dew on things in my yard, reminding me 
of observing sessions that were ruined by severe dew. I'm talking about puddles 
of water on my observing table and water dripping off my scope.

So, my question is this: Is there a way to predict dewing from the 
Clear-Sky-Charts and other data, say, by comparing transparency, humidity, and 
temperature?  The air-temperature/dewpoint relationship is not a good indicator 
of dewing because radiative cooling from a clear sky can cool objects well 
below both the air temperature and dewpoint.  It's a good predictor of fog.

Paul Lind
--
See message header for info on list archives or unsubscribing, and please send 
personal replies to the author, not the list.


--
See message header for info on list archives or unsubscribing, and please 
send personal replies to the author, not the list.

Other related posts: