[AZ-Observing] Re: Meteor Colors

  • From: "Keith Parizek" <keithparizek@xxxxxxx>
  • To: <az-observing@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2009 06:14:43 -0700

Hi Dan- When a meteor enters our atmosphere where does the color come from? 
Does it all come from the friction burning of the meteor mass itself or does 
the meteor passing thru our upper atmosphere ionize the atmosphere?  Maybe 
some of both.  What energy or force does it take to ionize the atmosphere?

Regards
Keith Parizek
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Dan Heim" <dan@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <az-observing@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2009 9:42 PM
Subject: [AZ-Observing] Re: Meteor Colors


Way back in the early 80s, shortly after I moved to PHX, there was a great
Perseid shower.  It was during that shower when I saw my first (there was
another many years later) "skipping" meteor.  It came in nearly parallel to
the north horizon, growing brighter slowly, then curved up and got dimmer,
then it came down again and increased in brightness a final time before
extinction.  The trajectory veered up and down by no more than 5°.  The
color was orange to red, and, to corroborate AJ's comment, it was a slow
meteor.

Dan Heim
President
Desert Foothills Astronomy Club
http://www.dfacaz.org

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "AJ Crayon" <acrayon@xxxxxxx>
To: <az-observing@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2009 8:45 PM
Subject: [AZ-Observing] Re: Meteor Colors


> From a web search the following, short versions, were found -
>     slow meteors can be seen as red or orange
>     silicon atoms and molecules of atmospheric nitrogen give a red light
>     silicate meteors produce fiery red colors
>
> There's lots more out there about this topic.
>
> AJ Crayon
> Phoenix, AZ
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Jimmy Ray" <jimmy_ray@xxxxxxx>
> To: <az-observing@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2009 8:23 PM
> Subject: [AZ-Observing] Meteor Colors
>
>
> To All,
>
> Happened to be outside at 00:45 Hours this morning looking out to the SSW
> when a small, fast meteor streaked east to west in the area of Canis
Minor.
> It left a momentarily persistent trail and was gone. It would have
normally
> been rather unmemorable except the color, which was an a dark orange-red,
> which was a first for me. The sky seemed clear (no perceptible smoke or
> such) and was about 45 degrees above the horizon. I have seen plenty of
> Green, blue, and white ones, exploding ones and even a "head on" one but
> orange-red? Any thoughts?
>
> Jimmy Ray
>
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>


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