[AZ-Observing] Re: Exposure estimate?

  • From: David Douglass <dmdouglass@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <az-observing@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 03 Oct 2018 17:07:25 -0700

Mike....
You say that you "understand" all that is being told... but "how to actually do 
all..."...
So.  Some basic guidance.
I am going to "assume" (gets me every time)... that you are Very New to 
astro-imaging.

Do you understand about taking "darks, flats, and bias" frames ??  Not a 
problem, if not. But it will have to be done before you can "process" the 
images.
A nice thing about that is that you can "pre-do" these, or, in most cases (not 
all), you can do them after that fact.  Flats are the tricky part there.

You mentioned earlier which camera you purchased, but I can't seem to find it.  
Which one.
And you mentioned LRGB.  So I am assuming you do NOT have a OSC (One Shot 
Color) model.  Do you have a filter wheel, and filters ??
As a general rule, I use 5 min exposures for DSO objects,  and 1-3 min for OC 
and Globs.  The brighter they are, the less time is needed.
Nebulae is another story. Again 5-min is a good "rule of thumb".

But then.... a 5-min exposure can be a tricky thing.  Do you have a guider, and 
know how to use it?  If not (to either).... then you will probably be limited 
to doing 30-45 sec exposures (or you will have "trailing" stars...). 

The best way to learn here is to practice.  Consider your next several 
"outtings" as just that.  Learning experiences, and experiment.
Then try and get together with an experienced imager for guidance.

Yup.... lots going on here.  And we have NOT even mentioned processing......


David Douglass
David@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx (main)
Dmdouglass@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx (Alternate)
Cell (602) 908-9092

On 10/3/18, 4:51 PM, "Michael McDonald" <az-observing-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx on 
behalf of mikemac@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

    Yes, thanks! I think I understand all of those concepts but it’ll probably 
take me awhile to figure out how to actually do all of those steps. Maybe I’ll 
have it figured out by the Messier Marathon in the spring. :-) In the meantime, 
I’ll experiment a bit this weekend at the AASP and hope to be lucky.
    
    Mike McDonald
    mikemac@xxxxxxxxxxx
    
    
    
    
    > On Oct 3, 2018, at 3:29 PM, Greg Schwimer <schwim@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
    > 
    > Be greedy!
    > 
    > This may be helpful. I can't avow to its accuracy.
    > 
    > 
http://www.gibastrosoc.org/sections/astrophotography/optimum-exposures-calculator
    > 
    > A rule of thumb that's worked for me is to take a set of darks at each 
exposure I might want to use. Stack them without bias calibration. Measure the 
median signal of each. This is the "floor" of noise at that exposure level and 
you need to get the background of your image above it. You want to "swamp" this 
noise floor with signal, so the median of your subs should be higher than that 
of the darks. 
    > 
    > An approach for determining how high above that dark I've seen used 
frequently is to subtract a master bias from the dark and take the median of 
the result. Triple this value and add it to the bias median value. Some say 
this is the minimum you should go for. I admit this can be tough on some 
equipment (e.g. slow optics and/or narrowband). Once you have that value as a 
starting point, take a few sample images and measure their median.
    > 
    > All cameras are different, and narrowband vs. RGB vs. bayer filters all 
have an impact due to the amount of signal that the filter allows to the 
sensor. Dark skies vs. light polluted skies will play a significant role in the 
results as does the brightness and size of the objects you're imaging as well. 
    > 
    > As for number of exposures, I believe the general rule of thumb is that 
SNR doubles with the square of the exposure count. That is, 4 frames has double 
the SNR of 2, 8 has double the SNR of 4, and 16 the double of 8. I generally go 
for 16 and call it done unless I see something very faint I'm after, but again 
there is a point of diminishing returns. You can see this play out quite easily 
by comparing stacks of multiple sizes side by side. 
    > 
    > Hope this helps!
    > Greg
    > 
    
    --
    See message header for info on list archives or unsubscribing, and please 
    send personal replies to the author, not the list.
    
    
    


--
See message header for info on list archives or unsubscribing, and please 
send personal replies to the author, not the list.

Other related posts: