atw: Re: Word processing is dead

  • From: "Stuart Burnfield" <slb@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: austechwriter@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2017 14:34:16 +0800

I doubt whether the Frame folks ever realistically thought they were
in a war with Microsoft for the "two-page office memo and student
essay" market. (Unless InDesign was also at war with MS Publisher for
the "make your own greeting card and church newsletter" market.)

Frame is a niche product that's optimized for people (such as TWs) who
are motivated to learn how to use it properly and reap the benefits.
Word *can* be used very effectively by motivated pros, but it's
*optimized* for people who just want to walk up and start typing,
possibly after they've had a couple of drinks.

An obvious solution would be a simpler, cheaper version that has 95%
of the features that 95% of users actually use. That was Microsoft
Works, and people didn't want it. In my experience office workers
didn't want to be 'deskilled' Works users, so they demanded to be
unskilled Word users.

There are a couple of modern approaches to this problem. Office 365
has a slightly pared back Web interface. It's Word looks just like
Word, with some missing options that most people probably wouldn't
notice. And the integration with email and cloud storage looks nice
(so far; I've only been using it for a week). In theory only people
who need to use full Word have to open the full, traditional Word
client.

For law firms and other large corporates the sanest solution by far is
something like Suzy Davis's template automation package. It's still
familiar to Word users, but it hides or puts cushions in front of the
sharp edges that commonly cause grief to the unwary.

--- Stuart

----- Original Message -----
From: austechwriter@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
To:"austechwriter@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" 
Sent:Thu, 27 Jul 2017 13:12:04 +1000
Subject:atw: Re: Word processing is dead

"If Framemaker was the answer, it would already have won the word
processing
 wars. It hasn't so clearly there is another problem that Adobe is
not."

Like, pricing, perhaps.

On 27 July 2017 at 11:51, Christine Kent  wrote:
I think this is a fairly nonsensical article. Sure, Word is too hard
for
 most people to extract a decent document from. That is a given. But
it is a
 far stretch to jump to the conclusion that word processing per se is
dead.
 Of course it isn't.

 While lawyers continue to want numbered clauses and contract
documents
 require all manner of numbered layouts, the only way to get them cost
 effectively is through word processing. Word processing simply has to
learn
 to do them better. A point will come were some other cost effective
and
 accessible package will knock Word off it's pedestal, not because it
does
 simple documents better - there have been lots of shots at that, that
have
 failed commercially - but because it does complex documents better.

 If Framemaker was the answer, it would already have won the word
processing
 wars. It hasn't so clearly there is another problem that Adobe is not
 addressing with Framemaker. So either Word has to fix the nonsense or
 another package - that is better presented and marketed than
Framemaker -
 will.

 Until then, we stay in work fixing corrupted documents. And surely
that is a
 good thing - for us!

 Bye the way, I am available to fix up bad documents if anyone can't
do it
 for themselves. I am technically retired but I take itty bitty work
to top
 up the coffers.

 Christine

 -----Original Message-----
 From: austechwriter-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [2]
 [mailto:austechwriter-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [3]] On Behalf Of Daryl
Colquhoun
 Sent: Thursday, 27 July 2017 10:10 AM
 To: austechwriter@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [4]
 Subject: atw: Word processing is dead

 Woody's Watch has just alerted me to an interesting article by Peter
Moon in
 the Australian Financial Review, 24 July.
http://www.afr.com/technology/apps/sorry-microsoft-but-word-processing-is-de
 ad-20170721-gxgbgl

 Documents are being created by people with inadequate skills. Perhaps
you've
 at some point received a Word doc that was set up as US letter size,
with US
 margins. I once received a contract to sign that had broken
 cross-references, and I don't need to explain how that happened. Moon
says
 that when "law firms are starting to rely on manually typed numbers
and
 references, word processing is dead".

 Some may remember Peter Moon's name. He had an article on much the
same
 subject in the AFR on 21 October 2008, which was reprinted (with
permission)
 in the ASTC newsletter.

 

Links:
------
[1] mailto:cmkentau@xxxxxxxxx
[2] mailto:austechwriter-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[3] mailto:austechwriter-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[4] mailto:austechwriter@xxxxxxxxxxxxx

Other related posts: