atw: Re: New skill set required

  • From: Peter Martin <prescribal@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: austechwriter@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 16 Aug 2018 14:31:51 +1000

Steve:

Somewhat OT but...

I recall reading somewhere that Chinese English has, among other things,
tended to bow towards Mandarin sentence formation,  emphasing the key
phrase in a sentence as something that should ideally come first in a
sentence.   That seems to have a logic which is understandable (but may be
far too logical for "proper" English).
Did you find this?
We're all somewhat acquainted locally with some Chinese English variants
which do things like omitting articles etc. (which again makes a certain
amount of sense in the right context, and is common enough in other
variants of English).    Are there other developments you noticed that
really stood out though?     And are there vocabulary additions from
Chinese being incorporated?

-Peter M

On 16 August 2018 at 12:46, Steve Hudson <sh1448291904@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

So long as it provokes an emotional response, and often the wrong orifice
is where you can get the greater emotional response…



Umm, we are still talking writing here I hope!



Steve Hudson

Word Heretic



*From:* austechwriter-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:austechwriter-bounce@
freelists.org] *On Behalf Of *Michael Lewis
*Sent:* Tuesday, 14 August 2018 7:50
*To:* austechwriter@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
*Subject:* atw: Re: New skill set required



…for them, language is a lump of putty to be shaped at will and forced
into any convenient orifice. Usually they appear to insert it into the
wrong orifice, but they don't care . . .

Other related posts: