[audacity4blind] Re: voice over narration

  • From: <tr.galanos@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 30 Nov 2019 18:28:15 -0600

Victor,
I can help you get started like I have with Justin. I am a very reasonable 
price too.

-----Original Message-----
From: audacity4blind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <audacity4blind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> 
On Behalf Of Victor Lawrence
Sent: Thursday, November 28, 2019 6:41 PM
To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: voice over narration

Hello:

I have a focus 40 braille display. It has panning buttons that allow me to pan 
the display to the right. By doing so, I am able to read the entire line or 
sentence.

I work for a radio station. When I record radio commercials, I often memorize 
as much of the script as possible before I record. Memorizing the script, or at 
least familiarizing yourself with the script before you record helps you make 
the recording sound more natural. But you can also record line by line, or 
sentence by sentence and edit out the pauses and other mistakes later. Doing it 
that way will also make your recording sound pretty good. It might not sound as 
natural to you, but it probably sounds just fine to the average listener. 
Besides, those of us with a trained ear can tell that many recordings are so 
digitally edited that you can tell that all of the breaths and pauses have been 
removed digitally. But that’s OK because it still sounds good.

Doing voiceovers and editing them properly as an art. Audio editing in general 
is an art. When done well, it sounds great. I want to get into voiceover work 
and advanced audio editing myself so I can make money. Someday I hope to do 
this from my own home studio.

Victor

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 28, 2019, at 3:21 PM, Sandra Gayer <sandragayer7@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Hello,
My name is Sandra. I am a Soprano Singer but I undertake a lot of 
radio work and voiceover work as well as acting. I only use my 
Braillenote to read a script as a back-up, I emboss my scripts as 
reading this way makes less noise during a recording. Also, the only 
pauses are page turns. If you trip up, slow down. In an audiobook 
context, it may even work for a particular character to use pause and 
varied speeds.

Justin,
When you say you want to enter the voiceover industry, do you mean you 
wish to make money or are you concentrating on getting your reading 
technique right first. My email address is sandragayer7@xxxxxxxxx if 
you want to talk to me off list.
Very best wishes,
Sandra.

On 11/28/19, Andrew Downie <access_tech@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
Hi Justin

Some further food for thought to add to the valuable suggestions 
already offered.  I briefly used a Focus 14 recently - not long 
enough to be completely familiar with it.  You mentioned going to 
next line.  I have a vague recollection that there is also an option 
to move right, which may resolve the issue you have with new material not 
appearing.

Out of interest, there is a competent blind news reader in Australia 
who uses JAWS with speech output.  She shadows what the screen reader is 
saying.
Long ago I tried that technique for a couple of presentations.  It 
worked, but did not suit the less formal style I wanted.  I do like 
the NVDA feature where pressing spacebar pauses at the exact spot.

I do envy people who can read Braille quickly enough to read material 
directly.  When I had access to a Braille display I used it to prompt 
me rather than reading from a complete script.  Whether that approach 
works will depend to some extent on the type of presentation.

Earlier this year I did a series of videos to demonstrate correct 
document structure.  An approach which worked well for me when 
tripping over my tongue was to pause and start the phrase again.  I 
then went through the recording and edited out the glitches.  In 
short (five minutes or so) recordings I found that approach less 
disruptive than stopping and fixing mistakes.  It may get a bit 
tedious for longer sessions.  That said, Audacity's excellent 
labelling facilities may prove useful.  At each position where you 
need to do some cleaning up, without stopping recording, press 
control-m and Enter.  By using alt-right arrow you can quickly locate 
each point where a correction is needed.  I have just checked and, 
pleasingly, as material gets deleted subsequent labels move left and still 
point to the relevant piece of audio.


Andrew


-----Original Message-----
From: audacity4blind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
<audacity4blind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> On Behalf Of Justin Williams
Sent: Thursday, 28 November 2019 7:13 AM
To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: voice over narration

I use JAWS 2019.
Focus 40 blue. Braille display
There could be a setting, I'm just using it on default.

Sometimes, when you go down a line, the braille doesn't appear and 
you have to go down again.
Maybe I need to put in on just one sentence per line.
80 gives you more relastate.

Thanks,

Justin







-----Original Message-----
From: audacity4blind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:audacity4blind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Robert ;
Hänggi
Sent: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 2:50 PM
To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: voice over narration

I don't think that there will be much clutter so don't worry.
What screen reader are you using?

It is a long time ago that I've used a Braille display.
I thought at the time that 40 cells were enough, 80 were rather 
painful for me over time due to the big movements.
I guess your device has automatic line switching, you might try that.
Don't worry about the pauses, Audacity is quite good at handling 
those (truncate silence, crossfade clips, etc.) Also, there's the 
punch out command (Shift+D) where you can record over a recent 
misttake at the end of the track, where it gives you the ability to 
listen to the section before it.
Robert

On 27/11/2019, Justin Williams <justin.williams2@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
Good afternoon,



I'm planning to go into voice overs and am looking for the best way 
to read scripts, so I'm assuming that some of you record

narration videos.



Please e-mail me off list as to not clutter it with responses for 
the question below.



I have a 40 cell braille display.



If I were to begin narrating audio books, or narration for 
professional learning videos for employees, is there a setting I 
should change for the most fluid reading, or should I just get an 80 
cell braille display.



If you have another strategy, please share with me.



Thanks,



Justin







The audacity4blind web site is at
//www.freelists.org/webpage/audacity4blind

Subscribe and unsubscribe information, message archives, Audacity 
keyboard commands, and more...

To unsubscribe from audacity4blind, send an email to 
audacity4blind-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
with subject line
unsubscribe



The audacity4blind web site is at
//www.freelists.org/webpage/audacity4blind

Subscribe and unsubscribe information, message archives, Audacity 
keyboard commands, and more...

To unsubscribe from audacity4blind, send an email to 
audacity4blind-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
with subject line
unsubscribe


The audacity4blind web site is at
//www.freelists.org/webpage/audacity4blind

Subscribe and unsubscribe information, message archives, Audacity 
keyboard commands, and more...

To unsubscribe from audacity4blind, send an email to 
audacity4blind-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
with subject line
unsubscribe




--
Sandra Gayer DipABRSM, LRSM.

Soprano Singer
www.sandragayer.com

Broadcast Presenter
www.rnibconnectradio.org.uk/music-box.html

Actor
www.visablepeople.com

Voiceover Artist
www.archangelvoices.co.uk/content/sandra-gayer

The audacity4blind web site is at
//www.freelists.org/webpage/audacity4blind

Subscribe and unsubscribe information, message archives, Audacity 
keyboard commands, and more...

To unsubscribe from audacity4blind, send an email to 
audacity4blind-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
with subject line
unsubscribe


The audacity4blind web site is at
//www.freelists.org/webpage/audacity4blind

Subscribe and unsubscribe information, message archives, Audacity keyboard 
commands, and more...

To unsubscribe from audacity4blind, send an email to 
audacity4blind-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
with subject line
unsubscribe



The audacity4blind web site is at
//www.freelists.org/webpage/audacity4blind

Subscribe and unsubscribe information, message archives,
Audacity keyboard commands, and more...

To unsubscribe from audacity4blind, send an email to
audacity4blind-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
with subject line
unsubscribe

Other related posts: