[audacity4blind] Re: Recording levels

  • From: "Sean Paul" <newsandtraffic@xxxxxxx>
  • To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 07:48:59 -0400

Yes, this mic comes with 2 cables. The USB pluggs directly in to the back of 
the mic, the XLR is also in the box & also pluggs directly in to the back of 
the mic. Both cables can be plugged in & in use at same time. Also, the mic has 
a small headphone jack on its backside. There is also a volume control on the 
rear of this mic as well. The mic comes with a 10 foot XLR cable, this was much 
to long for my setup, so I purchased a smaller 4 foot cable to run from the mic 
to my mixer & put the one that came in the box in my wire box for use later on 
if needed. Tip, when this mic is plugged in to your computer. It is audomaticly 
used as your sound card. So, JAWS & every other sound will start playing 
through the headphone jack on the rear, so, You'll need to plug in there & make 
any changes to make it start running back through your regular sound card. As 
I'm using an older version of JAWS, this took me some fooling with to get it 
switch back for JAWS. Any other questions, please ask
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Dang Manh Cuong 
  To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
  Sent: Thursday, May 09, 2013 07:38
  Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: Recording levels


  Hi Sean
  Your USB have two cables: USB and xlr. Isn't it? I'm about to buy it because 
it very cheap, but never heard about xlr cable, so dare not to buy.
  Thanks
    ----- Original Message ----- 
    From: Sean Paul 
    To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
    Sent: Thursday, May 09, 2013 6:32 PM
    Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: Recording levels


    Also Ron:
    Consider your mic when you're setting your audio levels. A Condenser mic, 
the type found in most computers, USB mics, etc. In my opinion need to have its 
audio set much louder than a  dynamic mic, tipicaly found in studio setups as 
you're tipically right up in a dynamic mic. Also, condenser mics will much more 
pic up background, around you noise than a dynamic mic will. So, you need to 
make sure that a condensers mic audio is set louder to drag your voice out of 
the around you, background noise. So, being right up in a dynamic mic will keep 
out background, around you noise. & you can set your audio levels a bit lower 
so that your voice doesn't overdrive the mic & clip the audio. For voice 
recording, I currently use an Audio Technica ATR-2100 mic. This mic is both a 
USB mic & an XLR mic. However, this unlike most tipical USB mics is a Dynamic 
mic. I like this mic for the fact that I can both use directly in to my 
computer as well as directly in to my mixer. I also like this mic as I can use 
using the camera kit directly connected with my iPad. Hope that this helps & 
wasn't either off topic for this list or over technical for this list.
      ----- Original Message ----- 
      From: Sean Paul 
      To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
      Sent: Thursday, May 09, 2013 07:15
      Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: Recording levels


      Ron:
      As pointed out here. This is a good podcasd, it may be a good idea to try 
to go back through some of Daniels content here & find some of his eps where he 
discusses audacity indepth.
        ----- Original Message ----- 
        From: Dang Manh Cuong 
        To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
        Sent: Thursday, May 09, 2013 06:24
        Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: Recording levels


        Ron
        Here is a podcast I've ever listened about microphone, and I think it 
would useful for you
        
http://theaudacitytopodcast.com/tap081-5-tips-to-sound-great-with-any-microphone/
          ----- Original Message ----- 
          From: Ron 
          To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
          Sent: Thursday, May 09, 2013 4:47 PM
          Subject: [audacity4blind] Recording levels


          Hi All.

          Once I've recorded something I always do a "normalise" to try to make 
the volume sound as normal as possible.

          Recently I have recorded  something where the volume is over all far 
too high.  Would a normalise actually fix this, or is there a way I can 
decrease the volume say by 5-10%.  My aim is to make all recordings the same 
level as, mp3 music or sound.

          Any help would be appreciated.

          Ron
        ________________
        Dang Manh Cuong
        HCMC University of Pedagogy:
        The Educational Psychology 
        Mobile: +84 902-572-300
        E-mail: dangmanhcuong@xxxxxxxxx 
        Yahoo! ID: manhcuong0312
        Skype name: dangmanhcuong
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05/09/13

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      Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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  ________________
  Dang Manh Cuong
  HCMC University of Pedagogy:
  The Educational Psychology 
  Mobile: +84 902-572-300
  E-mail: dangmanhcuong@xxxxxxxxx 
  Yahoo! ID: manhcuong0312
  Skype name: dangmanhcuong
  facebook: http://facebook.com/dangmanhcuong
  Blog: http://vi.netlog.com/Cuong_littlecat
  Website: http://ngoisaodanduong.com
  http://www.saomaicenter.org
  Projec-Website: http://dangmanhcuong.googlecode.com 
  No virus found in this message.
  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
  Version: 2013.0.2904 / Virus Database: 3162/6310 - Release Date: 05/09/13

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