[audacity4blind] Re: Recall: Normalizing Fade-outs

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jojoafbmil" for DMARC)
  • To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2019 15:38:57 +0000 (UTC)


Hello folks,

At times when I use the fade feature in audacity I repeat it over sections of 
the faded areas to tweak it out to the exact fade I am looking for. On other 
formats it much more difficult even when using automation. 
On Friday, January 4, 2019 David Bailes <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
Hi Annabelle,you had a conversation with Robert which when like this:
Annabelle said:Hi, it's Annabelle.If I have a mixdown of a recording, and it 
contains fades, is there a way that Audacity can essentially delete those 
fades, returning the whole recording to its loudest volume level? Better yet, 
is Audacity able to do this without ruining the recording? Is there a JAWS 
script for Audacity that focuses on the Spectragram?
Robert replied:That's tricky.

Do you roughly know where the fade starts and ends?

I would use adjustable fade to reverse the fades.

If it is a Fade-out:
Select the portion that you want to correct.
Open "Adjustable Fade"
Select "Fade Up"
Switch to dB (instead of percent)
Mid amplification: 0
Start (= initial amplification): 0 dB
End (=final amplification): 20 dB

Preview the result.
It has presumably still a fade out.
Adjust the final Amplification accordingly.
The maximum is 100 dB.

If the start and end sounds roughly the same but the middle drops or is louder:
change the "Mid-Fade Adjust" percentage.
It may be that you have to apply the effect multiple times.


You could also try the compressor but it is probably a bit difficult
to find the right settings.
First, check the peak of the selection (amplify effect).
Copy the value displayed (control+c) and apply the amplification.

Compressor:
Start with all sliders set to 0
the ratio on the other hand should be about 100 %.
Check "Makeup Gain" and "Based on Peaks"
OK.
Open amplify again
Paste the copied amplification value and put a minus in front of it
(home, followed by -).
Apply.

If you're unlucky, the peak is not quite the same and you have to
adjust manually. 
Annabelle replied:So for example, I have a fade in that starts at the beginning 
of the song, and 
ends right at the beginning of measure 3
Robert replied:In this case, you have to set the start in "Adjustable Fade" to 
100 dB
and the end to 0.
Annabelle replied:For a fade-in? So you're saying that 100 DB is the loudest 
level, then when 
the fade in ends, it goes silent? I'm confused on that one!
Robert replied:The loudest value (in your case at beat one of measure three) is 
0 dB
= 1.0 linearly or 100%.
The fade starts at minus 100 dB = 0.00001 linearly or 0.001  %.
To normalize a sound, we have to add a dB value such that we have 0 dB
eventually.
100 dB is just a big multiplication factor when translated into
percent: it would be 10000000 %.
However, adjustable fade doesn't allow such a big number in percent,
only 1000 % which is equal to 20 dB amplification.

Note: this high amplification is only for the beginning (or end for
fade-outs) and it will get smaller and smaller until 0 dB =
multiplication with 1.

Some values:
-40 dB = 1 %
-20 dB = 10 %
0 dB = 100 %
6 dB = 200 %
20 dB = 1000 %
26 dB = 2000 %
40 dB = 10000 %

and so on.


In summary:
0 dB means, don't amplify and 100 dB means amplify a lot.


It may be that the audio will sound a bit noisy after reversing the
fade. This is because the dynamic range or signal to noise ratio
(distance between noise and valuable sound) is very low at those -100
dB.

However, this extraneous amplification is very short and shouldn't
matter too much.

The End.David.







 

On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 at 17:30, Annabelle Susan Morison 
<foristnights@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Annabelle Susan Morison would like to recall the message, "Normalizing
Fade-outs".

Other related posts: