[audacity4blind] Re: Introduction and affect question

  • From: "Gene" <gsasner@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:21:06 -0500

It also may be that software not related to Audacity is causing the problem. There may be noise reduction software in the Microphone settings that is active and causing poor quality results. Someone who is familiar with the kind of tablet you are using or the version of Windows you are using may be able to address the matter further. Looking for such settings is probably the first thing to do. You can try another microphone, as I said, but if you are just plugging it into the microphone jack on the tablet, the same settings are still being used with the new microphone. If you try a USB microphone, then different settings will be used. But the first thing to do is probably to look at microphone settings and turn off all effects in the microphone settings. There is probably a check box somewhere you can use to turn off effects.

Gene
----- Original Message ----- From: "Gene" <gsasner@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 5:15 PM
Subject: Re: [audacity4blind] Re: Introduction and affect question


If you are recording and not changing the recording and it sounds muddy, it's probably the microphone. Fooling around with effects isn't a good way to try to solve this problem.

it probably isn't any of the things you mentioned, it's probably just a low quality microphone giving poor results.

Try using another microphone. You may be able to borrow one.
Gene
----- Original Message ----- From: "Blake Tracy" <blaketracy23@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 4:58 PM
Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: Introduction and affect question


Well, here is my problem.
My voice sounds extremely muddy and I don't know if it's filtering or compression or equalization or what, but I wanted to have better quality. I'm using a windows surface pro, and it internal mic. Also, I don't know whether frequency relates to pitch, or bass and treble type sounds. I understand reverbs, I understand delays, but that's about the extent of it.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 22, 2015, at 3:57 PM, Vasundhara Raturi <vasundhara.raturi.97@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Hi Tracy,

Yes, features like equalisation, reverb, etc., are very technical things and are useful for adding very precise special effects to music or any voice tracks. In order to know more about the use of every effect (and only if you are interested in them), you can certainly google them. Also, if you are interested to experiment and want to see how each of them is used in audacity, I would advise you to go to the help section in Audacity and read through the 'quick help' and 'manual' sections provided there. Hope this helps.

Regards,
Vasundhara

On Wed, Jul 22, 2015 at 9:29 PM, Blake Tracy <blaketracy23@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:


Hello all,
I am new to this list, but not so new to audacity. I've been kind of figuring it out on my own by hitting buttons and trying to figure out what they do. I don't know what half of anything means. Does anyone know of a good place to go about strange terms, such as equalization, compression, input and output when it comes to vote coding, etc.?
I appreciate any feedback,
Blake Tracy.
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