[audacity4blind] Re: Exporting Files in Audacity

  • From: "David Van Der Molen" <dvm975@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 13 Oct 2012 19:38:22 -0400

Sorry for the confusion.

I'm recording with a Zoom H1. I'm wondering if I should set this recorder to 96 KBPS when recording. Then I'd edit the recording on my PC in Audacity. After which I'd export the file at, say, 128 KBPS, since there seems to be a loss of quality when I export at the same KBPS as what I recorded in.

I'm recording myself reading a book that we're wanting to sell immediately on CDs, and, possibly, in MP3 format eventually.

I'm also wondering whether the low-cut filter should be on or off on my Zoom H1 while recording.

Dave
----- Original Message ----- From: "Gene" <gsasner@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2012 6:36 PM
Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: Exporting Files in Audacity


There is no 96kbps setting in the quality settings for audacity.  You said
in your question that you are going to record in Audacity.  Earlier, you
said you are going to record using a digital recorder.

96kbps is not a high quality recording setting.  Are you recording for
yourself?  Are you satisfied with the sound?  As far as I know, it doesn't
matter what format you are using, 9600kbps is not a high quality recording
and exporting to a 128kbps mp3 file would mean, as I understand it, that
you are using a higher quality mp3 setting than the original recording.
You can't improve the original recording by using a higher kbps setting in
the Mp3 file.

Please give details about what you intend to do.  Are you using a digital
recorder?  Are you recording files formatted as stereo or monaural files.
Are you transferring files from the digital recorder to the computer, then
working with them in audacity?  Are you asking about a 9600kbps rate
because that's the rate you are using in the digital recorder?

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: "David Van Der Molen" <dvm975@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2012 3:03 PM
Is 96 KBPS a high-quality MP3 format? If I decide to stick with Audacity,
record at 96 KBPS, edit the project and export to 128 KBPS, should that
give
me a high-quality recording?

Dave
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2012 11:57 AM
Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: Exporting Files in Audacity


I accidentally sent my last message before making one or two changes I
intended to make.  I intended to word the first paragraph as follows:

Instead of working with enormous wave files, I would suggest that
you try recording in a high quality mp3 format and editing using Mp3
Direct Cut.  If you don't like the results for some  reason, you can
use
wave files.  If you wwant to work with wave
files, then edit them in Audacity, which is not as easy or convenient
as
editing using Mp3 Direct Cut, then take the time to have these large
files
converted to Mp3 for their final form, that's your choice. I would
strongly advise you not to assume things such as that a high quality
wave
file will yield better results than a high quality mp3 file for spoken
word recordings.  I won't discuss music recordings in this message.  I
doubt  that anyone can tell the difference between
a 320kbps mp3 file of spoken word material and a high quality wave
file.
And since you intend to convert the material to mp3 anyway, even if
there
were any detectable difference, it would be  lost when you convert the
wave file to mp3.

No recording program serves all purposes well.  Audacity serves many
purposes well.  It is not as good  a choice for editing mp3 files as
Mp3
Direct cut where all you want to do is edit, not apply effects or
perform
other operations.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve the Fiddle" <stevethefiddle@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2012 8:56 AMI> I'd suggest recording at
44.1
/
16 PCM, and use a good fast flash
card. If the flash card can't keep up with the amount of data there
will be bits missing from the recording or other peculiarities. 44.1 /
16 should give excellent quality without overly stressing the H1 or
the flash card.

Steve

On 13 October 2012 15:23, David Van Der Molen <dvm975@xxxxxxxxx>
wrote:
If I want to record speech with my Zoom H1, and I want the best
quality
possible, even if the file is converted in the end to MP3, would it
be
best
to record in PCM Wav?  I have only two choices with the Zoom, either
PCM
Wav
or MP3.  If I choose PCM Wav, which sampling and bit rates should I
go
with?
My choices are 44.1-16, 44.1-24,  48-16, 48-24, 96-16, and 96-24.

After recording, I'd edit with Audacity.

Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: Johny cassidy
To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2012 8:11 AM
Subject: [audacity4blind] Re: Exporting Files in Audacity

I'd suggest saving the original track as a wav file. There shouldn't
be
any
loss in quality then

Sent from my iPhone

On 13 Oct 2012, at 12:44 PM, David Bailes <david_bailes@xxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

Hi Dave,
Are these recording of speech?
In the mp3 options when saving, is the bit rate mode set to constant?
If
so
you could set it to average, and see if this is an improvement.
Unfortunately, there will be at least some loss in quality after
decoding
from  and then re encoding to mp3 format.

David.

________________________________
From: David Van Der Molen <dvm975@xxxxxxxxx>
To: audacity4blind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Saturday, 13 October 2012, 12:27
Subject: [audacity4blind] Exporting Files in Audacity

I record my files in MP3 format (96 KBPS) with a Zoom H1 recorder.
When
I
edit the recordings, I'm quite okay with the sound quality.  When,
however,
I export these projects back into MP3 format, 96 kbps, I find that
the
quality deteriorates.  The recordings kind of sound tinny, like radio
stations' web broadcasts used to sound like.  Can I fix these MP3s
somehow?
Is there a particular equalizer that anyone would suggest that I use?

Dave



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