[asflanet] Friday seminar 4-5:30 Nov 6

  • From: "James Martin" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "james.martin" for DMARC)
  • To: "asflanet@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <asflanet@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2020 22:55:27 +0000

Hi all

We return to mixed mode this week.

The seminar will be by Gaga Stosic (Macquarie University); see abstract below.

If you are coming in person, and are not Sydney Uni staff or student, you need 
to click the following link to fill out a form granting you access to the 
campus:

sydney.edu.au/covid19-declaration<http://www.sydney.edu.au/covid19-declaration>

Use me as host. The building information is:

RC Mills A26
Mills Lecture Room 209

You will get an email in response which you need to retain and show on request 
when on campus. You need to do this for each seminar you attend.

Our room is limited to 27 participants. So far so good re number attending live.

A swipe key is needed to enter all campus buildings; find a local to let you in 
or wait until one of us opens the door to Mills in time for the meeting.

If you are attending on-line the link is:

https://uni-sydney.zoom.us/j/92880408601?pwd=Rnowa29TSWdGcS8vVXRLUWx4OWtrdz09

The password is: 919554

cheers

Jim


Title: Who’s who and what’s what in clinical psychology discourse

Presenter: Dragana (Gaga) Stosic

Abstract:

This presentation deals with the naming of people, things, activities and 
characteristics in clinical psychology. When it comes to the language of 
science, the concepts of ‘technicality’, ‘abstraction’ and ‘grammatical 
metaphor’ have attracted a considerable amount of attention within the SFL 
community (e.g. Halliday & Martin, 1993; Hao & Humphrey, 2019; Martin & Veel, 
1998). However, Hao (2020) argues that the relationships among these concepts 
are “far from clear” (p. 7). As a solution, she proposes that entity types 
within a given discipline be explored and described using a tri-stratal 
perspective, including field, discourse semantics, and lexicogrammar. Building 
upon Hao’s (2020) discourse semantic system of  entity type in undergraduate 
biology experiment reports, this talk explores the entities found in a sample 
of clinical trial reports that deal with depressive and anxiety disorders. To 
investigate the entities from ‘above’, it draws from a recently developed field 
network (Doran & Martin, 2021) and Hood’s (2010) distinction between ‘the 
object of study’ and the ‘field of research’. From ‘below’, it focuses on the 
experiential meanings at the group and clause levels (Halliday & Matthiessen, 
2014). From ‘around’, it comments on the interaction between entities and 
evaluation (Martin & White, 2005). Following these discussions, a comparison 
between the entity type systems in clinical psychology and biology will be 
made, with the former including: (a) ‘characteristic’ entities as well as more 
delicate classes of ‘source’ entities; (b) less delicate classes of ‘activity’ 
entities; and (c) the characterisation sub-system (in addition to 
categorisation and definition).

References:
Doran, Y. J., & Martin, J. R. (2021). Field Relations: Understanding scientific 
explanations. In K. Maton, J. R. Martin, & Y. J. Doran (Eds.), Studying 
science: Language, knowledge and pedagogy. London: Routledge.
Halliday, M. A. K., & Martin, J. R. (Eds.). (1993). Writing Science: Literacy 
and discoursive power. London: Falmer Press.
Halliday, M. A. K., & Matthiessen, C. M. I. M. (2014). Halliday’s Introduction 
to Functional Grammar (4th ed.). New York: Routledge.
Hao, J. (2020). Analysing scientific discourse from a systemic functional 
linguistic perspective. New York, NY: Routledge.
Hao, J., & Humphrey, S. L. (2019). Reading nominalizations in senior science. 
Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 42, 1–15. 
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2019.100793
Hood, S. (2010). Appraising research: Evaluation in academic writing. 
Basingstoke, England: Palgrave Macmillan.
Martin, J. R., & Veel, R. (Eds.). (1998). Reading science: Critical and 
functional perspectives on discourses of science. London & New York: Routledge.
Martin, J. R., & White, P. R. R. (2005). The language of evaluation: Appraisal 
in English. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Other related posts:

  • » [asflanet] Friday seminar 4-5:30 Nov 6 - James Martin