[argyllcms] Re: Testing my new printer

  • From: Graham White <g.graham.white@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: argyllcms@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 7 Jul 2019 19:11:44 +0100

Exactly.

Graham

On Sun, Jul 7, 2019 at 6:36 PM Henrik Olsen <henrikolsen@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:




Den 7. jul. 2019 kl. 16.41 skrev Graham White <g.graham.white@xxxxxxxxx>:

Well, I have just looked up the targen man page, and there is an
option -c which allows you
to specify a profile (ICC or MPP), and this profile will say  which
colour space the patches should
be generated it. Thus, it can be sRGB, or Adobe RGB, or whatever you
want: you're not limited to
sRGB.

It’s a preconditioning for better utilization of the number of device RGB 
values you are making a target for. If you know the approximate device 
behaviors gamma/gamut you have an advantage.
When you then later print and measure the device produced colors you can 
start discussing what gamut that output represents, how it compares to color 
spaces like sRGB, AdobeRGB etc. A reading of the printed target can explore 
what colors a device produces given various RGB values. The RGB values do not 
belong to any space as such. The device printed values on the other hand can 
be compared to various spaces for gamma/gamut. Some devices might result in a 
large gamut, some in a small,  given the same set of RGB values to print.
You will normally have included in targen patches outer extreme values to 
test response for 255,0,0; 0,255,0; 0,0,255 and other combinations. You  
explore what color (CIE) the device produce given RGB input (with fixed 
paper, printer and media settings), and reverse. You don’t have to ask it to 
explore “wider limits/“spaces”. The device will output as wide a gamut range 
as it’s capable of. The preconditioning is a help for getting as good a map 
as possible of that entire gamut. If high resolution is required of that map, 
go with more patches and high quality profile generation.
Hope it helps.

Best regards
Henrik






-- 
Graham White
London

Other related posts: