[argyllcms] Re: Printer Profiling RGB vs CMYK

  • From: Graeme Gill <graeme@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: argyllcms@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Mon, 9 Jul 2018 16:39:56 +1000

Gary . wrote:

Hi,

I have an HP3200 printer and the total ink set is represented by -d10 in targen.

right. But the native printer inkset isn't terribly relevant unless there is 
some
printing interface that exposes it. i.e. if the only print driver you have 
access
to just exposes an RGB interface, then that's all you have to work with.

I believe I understand CM but it isn't clear
how targen handles these two options regarding ink.

Do you have options though ? What printing interface exposes the native
printer inkset ? Typically this is either a RIP of something like
Gutenprint, and (in my understanding - correct me if I'm wrong) even
Gutenprint fudges the driver by using various tables and settings to
make the printer look like CMYK, rather than exposing the native
inkset to ICC profiles or using an ICC link as a CVMYK to native
separation table.

My printer's use is only for fine
art photography, and since the monitor is calibrated in RGB it seems -d2 would 
be the
correct option.

I'm not sure why you are talking about your display colorspace and your 
printers.
They are independent.

However,  when I investigate other ICC profiles that were provided by
various companies for the HP3200, I see that internally they are marked as CMK 
profiles
and a few are RGB profiles.

Interesting. Hard to know how your driver interprets the CMY profiles. What 
device
value corresponds to white in them ?

From this though it seems that your print driver only offers an RGB/CMY 3 
channel
emulation, using its own separation tables to the native inkset.

Targen usage summary only explains that -d selects the
colorspace. I'm using Adobe1998 colorspace usually, so does a -d10 offer more 
exact
color definition than using only -d2 when generating the target colorspace. 
Thanks for
any information on this.

See above. Your use of AdobeRGB is not at all relevant. The whole point of a 
device
profile is to allow a CMM to convert from one colorspace (i.e. AdobeRGB) to 
another
(i.e. your printers colorspace.) An ICC device profile defines each colorspace. 
The
CMM links them on the fly to form a colorspace conversion.

Cheers,
        Graeme Gill.



Other related posts: