[argyllcms] Re: GCR Profiles, Gray Balance

  • From: <graxx@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <argyllcms@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2019 10:38:28 -0400

Graeme,

I should probably stick with xicclu to do the conversion from CIE Lab to CMYK 
but I want to "finish" first with doing it with Photoshop, otherwise, I'll lose 
the ability to compare results.

But you are 100% right, I think? The "poor" dark neutral behavior probably 
comes from applying Black Point Compensation. 

I am redoing all the conversions with RelCol No BPC in Photoshop now and will 
do the exact same with Perceptual after. 

I'm looking forward to the results! 
Hopefully after I come back from the dentist ☹

/ Roger

P.S. Is there a way to have xicclu process the contents of a text file? Instead 
of one value at a time?

-----Original Message-----
From: argyllcms-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <argyllcms-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> On Behalf 
Of Graeme Gill
Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2019 4:05 AM
To: argyllcms@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [argyllcms] Re: GCR Profiles, Gray Balance

graxx@xxxxxxxxxxxx wrote:

Converting Lab = 0.00 0.00 0.00 to CMYK in Photoshop, through the 
profile, using RelCol w/BPC, yields 99c 24m 63y 99k. That's what Page 2 shows.

I'm not sure what Photoshop is doing, because that's not what's in the
profile:

xicclu -fb -ir Argyll_Enhance_2019_07_09.icm
0.000000 0.000000 0.000000 [Lab] -> Lut -> 1.000000 0.000000 0.729204 1.000000 
[CMYK]

Perhaps BPC is mucking it up ?

The first patch on top of that page is made up of this exact CMYK 
build, which was output on my printer with "No Color Management". To 
the left of the patch, the measured M1 CIE Lab value is shown to be 23.85 
-0.46 -3.87.

But what's the relative colorimetric measurement ?
(Because your measurements don't look like relative values,  they look like 
Absolute values.)

I agree that 99c 24m 63y 99k shows up as CIE Lab
24 1.00 -2.00 in Photoshop Info palette, using Edit > Color Settings > 
Conversion Options set to Absolute Colorimetry. I won't dispute that fact.

Which means that argyll's "theoretical" prediction is "right". Yet, 
the actual measured colorimetry does not match that prediction.

Compare Relative to Relative (No BPC - it adds an unknown modification to the 
transform!) and Absolute to Absolute - don't mix them up, they won't match.

Cheers,
        Graeme.



Other related posts: