[access-uk] Re: Switching to android

  • From: Ian McNamara <ianmcnamara92@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2019 17:35:20 +0000

Hi Steve,

Thanks for that information, that’s useful to know. I am lightly to go for a 
phone to be honest and just use it like a tablet without putting a sim in it. 
That way I can judge the experience without actually using it as a phone and 
then if I do happen to like it potentially in the future look at using it as a 
phone if I decide it’s something I feel I would gradually start using either as 
a replacement for the iPhone or along with. I do have to say there are more 
options on Android in regards to choice and I do like the fact if you want to 
buy from places like audible you can do that directly with the Android App 
where as with IOS you have to still do it from the site and then use the app to 
play the things you buy.

Best wishes.

Ian Mcnamara 

On 28 Oct 2019, at 17:28, Steve Nutt <steve@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Hi Ian,
 
For you, I’d get a phone rather than a tablet, but just use it on Wi-Fi, you 
don’t have to put a Sim in it.  That way you can see the whole phone 
experience, without dialing numbers.
 
I also have to say Android tablets are not as good in my experience, as the 
phones, they are certainly not as good as iPads.
 
All the best
 
Steve
 
From: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
<access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>> On Behalf Of Ian 
McNamara
Sent: 28 October 2019 15:56
To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: [access-uk] Re: Switching to android
 
This is indeed interesting information.
 
I have recently started a job and part of that will be to test with Android 
in the future once I have been trained by the company and have got a suitable 
device. I currently have a braille note touch however for work I would like 
something more up to date with android on it. I have not decided as of yet 
weather a phone or a tablet is my best option. I am sort of thinking tablet 
because I already use an iPhone as my main phone and currently am not eager 
to change from that. I also don’t really want to different phone numbers.
 
I don’t think that I would permanently switch from iPhone to android however 
I am now curious about Android with the improved accessibility etc.
 
Best wishes.
 
Ian McNamara


On 28 Oct 2019, at 15:47, Sarah Stephenson-Hunter 
<sarahlstephenson@xxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:sarahlstephenson@xxxxxxxxxxx>> wrote:
 
Hi Steve,
 
That’s a very honest and helpful response.
 
I’m glad it’s more of a lifestyle than accessibility choice as this is a 
good place to be.
 
I’m not a braille user so that’s not an issue for me.
 
I think my main driver for contemplating is the cost of  iPhones.  I know 
there are ways and means of getting them a bit cheaper but looking at new 
Android phones there is a lot more flexibility of choice and cost options.  
I don’t want this to get into an argument over which is better value for 
money, better phone etc. but it is a consideration for me.  I also like the 
way my partner can easily use mp3’s as ringtones, text tones etc. without 
having the faff that you have on IOS but that in itself isn’t a reason 
enough to switch.
 
I will perhaps look again at possible phones and weigh it up a bit more.  
Both my partner and 16 year old son have had Huawei phones for a while now 
and have been impressed with them so that’s where I’m starting.
 
Thanks as ever for your advice.
 
Sarah
 
 
From: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
<access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>> On Behalf Of 
Steve Nutt
Sent: 28 October 2019 15:07
To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: [access-uk] Re: Switching to android
 
Hi Sarah,
 
I use both, so I am not a switcher, but I will answer your questions as 
honestly as I can below:-
 
What apps won’t I be able to get on android (I do use Soundscape and 
Seeingai)?
 
You will get neither of those on Android unfortunately, they are iOS only.  
Envision AI, or Eye-D Pro are good alternatives on Android, but there is 
nothing quite like SoundScape on Android.
 
How different really are the gestures?
 
The main differences are flicks up and down instead of the rota, and Android 
doesn’t have multi-fingered gestures, so there is no doing anything with 
more than one finger to operate Talkback.  This also means that one down 
side of Android for you may be that you don’t get the magic tap, that is 
double tap with two fingers for global play/pause or answering the phone 
etc.  The up side for me though is you can do everything with one hand.
 
What will I gain from switching?
 
It depends on what you’re looking to gain.  You may not gain anything by 
switching, depending on how comfortable you are with iOS.  Both are so 
accessible now, that I’d say it’s a lifestyle, rather than an accessibility 
choice, unless you are a Braille user, in which case, iOS is undoubtedly 
better.  What you might gain with Android though, is more choice of speech 
synthesisers.
 
How long does it take to learn the new eivnornment?
 
How long is a piece of string??  It really depends on how patient you are, 
and how much inclination you have to learn it.
 
You could start here:-
 
https://support.google.com/accessibility/android/answer/6151827?hl=en-GB ;
<https://support.google.com/accessibility/android/answer/6151827?hl=en-GB>
 
This will give you the scoop on Talkback.
 
http://www.inclusiveandroid.com ;<http://www.inclusiveandroid.com/>
 
Will give you independent tutorials, not produced by Google.
 
I hope this helps.
 
All the best

Steve

Other related posts: