[access-uk] Re: Studying at the open uni

  • From: "Jackie Brown" <jackieannbrown62@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2019 15:58:49 -0000

Hi Kirsty

I too am doing an Open degree, having carried some credit to the OU from my
HND in Practical Journalism.  This has now brought me to Level Three and
what I am doing this year.  Next year, I hope to complete my degree with
Advanced Creative Writing, (A363).

My tutors Email me presentations or tutorial materials they are going to use
in forum situations which is useful as I simply don't have the time or
inclination to attend those things.  By the time teatime comes, I'm done
for, I just can't put myself through any more by then which is to do with my
medical condition.

Good luck for the remainder of your course Kirsty, and to you Luke if you
embark on anything with the OU.

Kind regards,

Jackie Brown
Email: jackieannbrown62@xxxxxxxxx

-----Original Message-----
From: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> On Behalf Of Kirsty
Major
Sent: 05 February 2019 14:23
To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [access-uk] Re: Studying at the open uni

Hi Luke and Jackie,

I would echo a lot of what Jackie has already said. You need to be clear
about what you need and how you work so that you can make the most of what's
available. 

I started my OU degree in October, so only have experience of the first
module.

I'm doing a part-time open degree, which means I choose my modules. This has
the benefit of allowing me to make choices balancing what I want to do with
which modules are more likely to be accessible. The level of accessibility
will depend to some extent on what you want to do. 

I'm studying mainly IT modules, and there are some activities that do
require a degree of sighted assistance. You can apply for assistance with
this in advance, or organise your own. 

I have access to my module's materials online via the OU website, or I can
download electronic versions to work with offline. There are also audio
versions available, but I haven't used these, so can't comment on them. If
there are diagrams or images to illustrate a point, written descriptions are
provided.

I find the website to be accessible. It's good to familiarise yourself with
how it works, and there are things that you can do to make life easier for
yourself. For example, you can view all of a document on one page, which
would probably be a lot of scrolling for a sighted user, but if you're using
Jaws, it means that you can navigate by headings and move about in a larger
document more efficiently.

The forum area is accessible with Jaws, and students often make use of other
social media sites too, such as Facebook. It's not mandatory, but it's a
nice way to get in touch with others on your course or who share your
interests,  if that's what you want to do.

My biggest difficulty at the beginning was actually getting through to
someone to talk about accessibility. This was somewhat frustrating as I
wanted to check the accessibility of the modules I wanted to study before
signing up for them. However, once I got through to someone who knew about
screenreaders and accessibility, they were very helpful. My tutor has been
helpful too, both in discussing my additional requirements, and helping to
move things along when some accessible materials were missing.

My module has in-person or online tutorials. I've opted for the online ones,
but the system used for them isn't great in terms of accessibility. At
least, my experience with Jaws has been a bit erratic. You can access all
the areas on the screen, such as the chat window, but if Jaws loses focus,
the only reliable way I've found to get it working again is to leave the
room, which is tedious! This means that I mainly just listen and don't use
the chat, but the tutorials are more like lectures with a tutor providing
information than a collaborative group activity. At least in my module they
are. I haven't given up with it - I also want to try the app. To be fair,
maybe other screenreaders work better. As problems to fix go, it's not very
high on my list, but I wanted to be honest. Generally tutors have been happy
to email me their presentations in advance so that I can read along on my
laptop.

In my module, some assignments are completed online, whereas others are
documents that you create and send to your tutor using the online file
sharing tool. My tutor agreed to use a specific character to mark his
comments so that I can do a search for it and locate his comments quickly as
using colours is not helpful to me.

Really, a lot depends on what you want to study, but overall my experience
has been very positive. I had to pull out of a course a number of years ago
due to accessibility issues, and things have definitely improved since then.

There is a group for disabled students on Facebook, so if you wanted to try
and find other students with accessibility needs who were studying modules
that you are looking at, that might be another place to try.

I hope that helps,
Kirsty

Kirsty Major
English with Kirsty

www.englishwithkirsty.com
www.facebook.com/englishwithkirsty
www.xing.com/profile/Kirsty_Major

Have you visited my free resources for learners of English page?
www.englishwithkirsty.com/tips


-----Original Message-----
From: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of
Jackie Brown
Sent: 03 February 2019 14:15
To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [access-uk] Re: Studying at the open uni

Hi Luke

I am currently studying for an OU degree.  My experience is that you need to
be quite specific about your needs regarding materials in alternative
formats.  Last year, for example, I did Creative Writing, (A215), which is a
Level Two module.  The materials were all accessible, and my tutor was
really friendly to approach.  This year, I am studying a Level Three module
called Children's Literature, (EA300).  The materials are less accessible,
and there has been a large reading list.  Most of the set texts have come
from the RNIB Talking Book library which haven't been marked up for study
purposes, in other words, no page numbers in the books which you need in
order to reference them.  There are generally workbooks or readers you use
for a lot of these modules, and this year's have been littered with mistakes
where whoever transcribed them didn't do a good enough job with the PDF
versions.  However, I've got the DAISY equivalents and am able to do what's
required.  The tutor is helpful, and I've alerted her to some of the issues
I've come across with the materials.  I find sending in my assignments easy
enough as there is an online service you use to submit your work.  What I've
asked my tutors to do is to write their comments on my assignments in full
rather than use different colours and track changes which work less
satisfactorily with a screen reader.  I tend not to join in with online
forums and webinars because I'm generally exhausted by the time I've done
some work during the day and want to give it a rest to enjoy something else.

Studying at degree level, as anyone will tell you, is a challenge, but
especially distance learning where your own motivation is absolutely
critical.  I'm incredibly lucky to have my husband's support as he completed
his BSC Honours in Psychology some years ago with the OU when cassettes were
very much the order of the day, so he's been a tremendous help for sharing
ideas.  In fact, I couldn't have done this without him.

After this module, I have one more Level Three module to do to complete my
OU degree.  I'm enjoying it, I would recommend it, but it does require a lot
of determination.  And, as I say, you do have to make the OU aware of what
you require or you'll be left to it.

I hope this helps, but do shout me off list if there is something specific
you want to know.

The very best of luck.

Kind regards,

Jackie Brown
Email: jackieannbrown62@xxxxxxxxx

-----Original Message-----
From: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> On Behalf Of Luke
Scholey
Sent: 03 February 2019 12:49
To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [access-uk] Studying at the open uni

Hi all

Has anyone studied at the OU before? If so, would you mind telling me about
what it was like as a blind / VI student. I know their disability support is
meant to be excellent and am just looking for peoples opinion and a chance
to ask some questions.

Thanks
Luke 

--
Luke Scholey
Webmaster i/c Publishing
lukescholey.co.uk
Tel: +44 7759 282586
Email: l.scholey@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

WWW.LUKESCHOLEY.CO.UK
All feedback and questions welcome. The site admin can be contacted at:
webmaster@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
All content copyright C 2012-2019 LukeScholey.co.uk Confidentiality Notice:
This message and any attachments are private and confidential and may be
subject to legal privilege and copyright. If you are not the intended
recipient please do not publish or copy it to anyone else. If you have
received this message in error please notify the sender immediately by using
the reply facility in your email software and then remove it from your
system.
Disclaimer:
Although this email and attachments have been scanned for viruses,
LukeScholey.co.uk accepts no liability for any loss or damage arising from
the receipt or use of this communication.
** To leave the list, click on the immediately-following link:-
** [mailto:access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx?subject=unsubscribe]
** If this link doesn't work then send a message to:
** access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
** and in the Subject line type
** unsubscribe
** For other list commands such as vacation mode, click on the
** immediately-following link:-
** [mailto:access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx?subject=faq]
** or send a message, to
** access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the Subject:- faq

** To leave the list, click on the immediately-following link:-
** [mailto:access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx?subject=unsubscribe]
** If this link doesn't work then send a message to:
** access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
** and in the Subject line type
** unsubscribe
** For other list commands such as vacation mode, click on the
** immediately-following link:-
** [mailto:access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx?subject=faq]
** or send a message, to
** access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the Subject:- faq


** To leave the list, click on the immediately-following link:-
** [mailto:access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx?subject=unsubscribe]
** If this link doesn't work then send a message to:
** access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
** and in the Subject line type
** unsubscribe
** For other list commands such as vacation mode, click on the
** immediately-following link:-
** [mailto:access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx?subject=faq]
** or send a message, to
** access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the Subject:- faq

** To leave the list, click on the immediately-following link:-
** [mailto:access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx?subject=unsubscribe]
** If this link doesn't work then send a message to:
** access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
** and in the Subject line type
** unsubscribe
** For other list commands such as vacation mode, click on the
** immediately-following link:-
** [mailto:access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx?subject=faq]
** or send a message, to
** access-uk-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the Subject:- faq

Other related posts: